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Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C review

Andrew Williams

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Reviewed:

Summary

Our Score

8/10

Pros

  • Good battery life
  • High-quality screen
  • Fairly powerful 64-bit CPU

Cons

  • Hard plastic back comes across a little cheap
  • Beaten on pure value by some
  • Too many pre-installed apps

Review Price £179.00

Key Features: 7-inch, 1,920 x 1,200 IPS screen, 64-bit Intel Atom processor; 16GB storage with microSD slot; Intel Atom Z3560 CPU

Manufacturer: Asus

What is the Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C?

The Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C is the highest-end tablet in the MeMO line, which has to date been home to real entry-level tablets. This one costs you £180, and gets you similar specs to the Nexus 7.

Now that tablets like the Tesco Hudl 2 are here to take the shine of its value score, we do wish the Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C was a little bit cheaper to make it stand out more. There’s masses of competition among budget tablets these days.

However, solid performance and a great Full HD screen make the Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C if you don’t like the excessive branding of the Hudl 2 or the lack of expandable memory in the Nexus 7.

SEE ALSO: Best Cheap Tablets

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C 5

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C: Design

Asus clearly wants to separate the MeMO Pad 7 ME572C from the cheaper MeMO-series tablets. The chunky curvy design of those bargain tabs has been replaced with a much slimmer body and a sharper look.

While the sides are curved so they don’t feel to severe in-hand, the corners are sharp – a look quite unlike most other budget 7-inch tablets. It’s 8.3mm thick, making it ever-so-slightly thinner than the Nexus 7, and at 269g it’s a bit lighter too.

That’d all be impressive if the Nexus 7 wasn’t all-but ancient history at this point. While it’s still a ‘current’ model, the 7-inch Nexus is well over a year old.

SEE ALSO: Best Android Tablets

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Thinner and lighter isn’t really what we were after in the MeMO Pad 7 ME572C, though. Dimensions-wise the only thing we’d like to tweak here is the height of the tablet. There’s a good expanse above and below the screen, especially above it. While we agree with keeping a bit of space on which thumbs can rest, there’s more than we need here. It exacerbates an issue with widescreen tablets: they can feel a bit… long.

We expect there’s quite so much blank blackness here because Asus needs the space to fit in all the MeMO Pad 7 ME572C’s components. But given it’s the same height as the Nexus 7, we’d hope to see some progress by now. For those who don’t know yet, Asus also makes the Nexus 7. There’s a mild whiff of water-treading here.

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C 17

The finish is a bit contentious too. The MeMO Pad 7 ME572C’s back panel has an embossed texture for extra grip, but it’s otherwise plain, hard plastic. There’s not a hint of soft-touch feel to the back. It’s the only element of the design that comes across as a bit cheap.

It’s clearly a conscious design choice too, as the non-textured rounded edges are soft-touch. You’ll get used to it, but we felt a wave of disappointment on first holding the MeMO Pad 7 ME572C, after hearing about how much of a step up this represents for the MeMO series.

The Nexus 7 has a marginally nicer feel, but the MeMO Pad 7 ME572C has its own share of benefits. Perhaps the most important is the microSD slot on the left edge. You get 16GB of storage as standard, and having a memory card to call on too makes this a much better portable media player than the Nexus 7.

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C 25

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C: Speaker Quality

The MeMO Pad 7 ME572C also offers proper stereo speakers, but they’re not a total smash. Sitting on the sides of the tablet when held in landscape, they offer a great stereo image. In the right conditions they offer a much more expansive soundstage and you get with most rear speakers.

We say ‘the right conditions’ because they’re far too easy to block with your hands, especially when playing landscape-aspect games. The outlets sit slap-bang in the middle of each side and are only about an inch across. Your hands naturally fall over them: it’s a real design fail.

The Tesco Hudl 2 speaker design is much better – they sit on the back but are placed above where your hands rest.

Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C 35

Sound quality of the Asus MeMO Pad 7 ME572C is fair, but not great. There’s a good amount of top-end detail, but it’s also slightly top-heavy. While there’s a bit more mid-range than truly tinny speakers, they fail to bring the extra power we listen for in a tablet speaker. Still, we’d class them as above average if it wasn’t for the glaring practical issue of placement.

The Tesco Hudl 2 offers slightly less finesse, but a weightier sound that’ll probably work better in many conditions.

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Shogun

November 15, 2014, 10:39 am

A 176cx is the succesor of the 173 which has the same resolution and memory but better SoC.
This 572 is superior in every aspect. FHD, double the memory, faster, less weight, etc....

Moose

November 16, 2014, 12:49 pm

I would like a good quality 7 inch tablet with data. Most of them are a bit too cheap and cheerful for my taste. This Asus might be the best available. My only worry is the overly wide bezels which Asus can't seem to get rid of. They should try to emulate the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 in this respect. I want a small tablet that i can carry around on a day to day basis but the compactness of a 7 inch screen is destroyed by extra wide bezels. I wouldn't have touched the Nexus 7 with a 10-foot pole precisely because of the ugly wide bezels.

Steve Kruckheimmer

December 6, 2014, 7:26 pm

As you clearly demonstrate in one of your photos, with you holding the left edge of the tablet, the spacious bezels provide a convenient way to grip the device. Now, is that such a bad thing? Do you think it should just float in mid-air? Both small hands, and big
hands, would have a problem with “extra-thin” bezels – on devices of this particular size or bigger – for touch-sensitive devices like this. The people at Asus are evidently much more thoughtful than you had imagined. Everyone can’t be expected to handle these things, gingerly, only by the edges, even though such a thing might come naturally for some. Given its mid-size form factor, what advantage would be afforded by making the device half an inch shorter? Nobody expects to carry around a 7-inch tablet in a shirt-pocket, no matter how thin.

Also, it seems that “great” sound out of a tablet would be an oxymoron. Did you want to throw a party? The presence of speakers that provide ANY degree of clear sound whatsoever is appreciated, I don’t know what Nirvana you reviewers are expecting, it seems the laws of physics have already been exceeded. Does it at last provide full-bodied sound when plugged into auxiliary speakers? – that might be a more relevant issue to address.

Steve Kruckheimmer

December 6, 2014, 7:36 pm

Mitch, it seems you would have other things to worry about than the "overly wide" bezel of what has been described by some as "The Perfect Tablet." As the reviewer for this article clearly demonstrates in one of his photos, with him holding the left edge of the tablet, the "spacious bezels" provide a convenient way to grip the device. Now, is that such a bad thing? Do you think it should just float in mid-air? Both small hands, and big hands, would have a problem with “extra-thin” bezels – on devices of this particular size or bigger – for touch-sensitive devices like this. The people at Asus are evidently much more thoughtful than you had imagined. Everyone can’t be expected to handle these things, gingerly, only by the edges, even though such a thing might come naturally for some. Given its mid-size form factor, what advantage would be afforded by making the device half an inch shorter? Nobody expects to carry around a 7-inch tablet in a shirt-pocket, no matter how thin.

Ewizzle

December 20, 2014, 1:17 am

best product in tech that nobody knows about!

I just picked one up, and am very happy with with. The quality feels really good for a $180 tablet. Very solid, and MUCH more premium build quality than the 2012 Nexus 7 that I'm replacing, which is 100% budget tablet across the board.

The screen is the highlight. Bright, crisp, and colors pop. I really like the speakers as well. having stereo speakers is a huge plus. And although I would prefer then on the front, they are loud and pretty crisp. Being on the sides instead of the back make a very solid difference. I don't block them with my hands either, not a valid complaint. Again comparing to the 2012 N7, it is a huge improvement.

It is very fast, and I've had none of the screen lag I've heard about. No light bleed issues that are obvious.

The feel and design is nice, and I've seen some comparisons to Nokia/MS Lumia devices, and I would agree. It is different than most products out there. Solid, firm, but also nice and light, in a good size frame. The bezels are a little large, but I"m not overly concerned there.

The buttons placement is a little diferent, but they are very raised above the edge and are solid and clicky.

The SD card slot is a BIG DEAL.

CONS: ASUS's skin is just ok. I don't love it, but it isn't that intrusive. However, the amount of bloat they but on this is crazy. There are about 20 apps that come pre-loaded, and aren't removeable, or dis-able, which is VERY annoying for me.

After setup, and playing with it, the 1st thing I did is go to XDA and download the root apk. It is super easy. I removed all the crap-ware that I will never use, and was happy to risk it. Doesn't seem to be a boot unlocker for it yet, but I'll keep looking. Would be the best small/budget table of 2014 if it had pure Lollipop on it. HANDS DOWN.

John

December 22, 2014, 5:17 am

what link did you go to for the root apk on the XDA website?

Bill Owen

January 9, 2015, 9:20 pm

Whinging about how the back feels is a bit silly as most people will use a case and never feel the back. But that's always the case with reviews, the reviewers thinks they have to complain about something, or in this case, ANYTHING.

Bill Owen

January 9, 2015, 9:21 pm

Where did you find it for that price? It's listed at $179 pounds, like twice as much.

Bill Owen

January 9, 2015, 9:23 pm

Complaining about tablet speakers shows a remarkable lack of any knowledge of physics or acoustics.

Ewizzle

January 9, 2015, 9:29 pm

at Best Buy. The US website has it at $180 US

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/se...

Ewizzle

January 9, 2015, 9:30 pm

Here is the link to the thread... use at your own risk

http://forum.xda-developers.co...

purpleroba

January 26, 2015, 9:03 pm

Well, this is just my personal opinion based on a few Android tablets I had, but it is more like Android-specific issue, rather than Asus (but my two recent tablets are both made by Asus..., so, I may be wrong). My ME572C acts strange when battery level is getting low as you mentioned. I have purchased mine only a few weeks ago, but I have seen way many times my ME572C went out of juice after a few hours in sleep mode while it was saying 30% charge remained before the sleep. Although online reviews tells you that the battery should last 11 hours or so under their software tests, mine only last for 4-5 hours at the best. If you are wondering, I don't play games much. With intermittent use throughout a day with casual web browsing, checking emails, etc., it may make a day. If you forget to charge for two days, even you are not using the tablet, you better expect the battery to be dead. I have tried several battery saving apps that stops wifi while the tablet is in sleep mode, but it did not make much of difference. It is a shame because ME572C is a great tablet. Nice screen, quick response, nice design, etc...

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