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Moto Watch 100 smartwatch officially launches

Motorola’s Moto Watch 100 has very quietly landed, with a budget price tag, impressive stamina, and a complete lack of Wear OS.

We’ve been expecting this budget Moto wearable since the end of October, when it emerged that the brand was working with Canadian company eBuyNow to roll out a range of smartwatches.

Now the first fruits of that partnership is here in the Moto Watch 100. Head on over to the official Motowatch website and potential US and Canada customers will find the Moto Watch 100 available to pre-order for $99.99. It should ship by December 10.

That price tag is quite remarkable from the brand that brought us the Moto 360 line of premium Android-powered wearables. Of course, the last of those Moto 360 smartwatches wasn’t made by Motorola at all but – you guessed it – Canadian company eBuyNow.

It seems this team-up has different plans for the latest line-up. The Moto Watch 100’s most notable trait, other than its price tag, is the lack of Wear OS. Instead it runs on a home-brewed Moto Watch OS.

Other than that, you get a 1.3-inch 360 × 360 LCD display, which is quite a low-cost component, though there is an always-on display facility. This screen is wrapped up in a 42mm aluminium case, which comes in either Glacier Silver or Phantom Black.

The brand is claiming a considerable 14 hours of battery life. There’s a clear sports focus here too, with 26 sport modes, a 5 ATM water resistance rating, a heart rate monitor, and an SpO2 sensor. You don’t get onboard GPS, however, so you’ll need to take your phone with you if you want to track your runs.

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