Summary

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Key Features: 13-inch 3,200 x 1,800p resolution screen; 4th generation Intel Core processor; Thin and light; Windows 8.1; Backlit keyboard

Manufacturer: Lenovo

Hands-on: Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro preview

What is the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro?

The Lenovo Yoga is pretty much synonymous with the Windows 8 tablet/laptop hybrid, and it's now been given an upgrade in the form of the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro. The new Yoga 2 Pro model is thinner, lighter and introduces a higher resolution 13-inch screen at 3,200 x 1,800p, and seems to be everything you’d want from a flagship laptop upgrade

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Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro – Design

Although the Yoga Pro 2 isn’t a great deal thinner than last year’s model, it appears slimmer due to the new tapered edges. The top and bottom edges of the Yoga 2 Pro narrow, but in a slightly more severe fashion than the Macbook Air 2013 highlighted by the orange finish on the model we got time with.
 
Weighing in at 1.39kg, the Yoga 2 Pro shaves quite a bit off the 1.54kg original, which should make it easier to use as a tablet for longer periods. It certainly feels light when we had time with it, but it will be interesting to see how it feels when being used for an extended period.
 
Lenovo has introduced a backlit keyboard in the Yoga 2 Pro too, which is a great new feature that makes the Windows 8.1 hybrid more akin to the MacBook Pro or MacBook Air in design. When using it in tablet mode, you can still feel keys being pressed on the other side. Although you know they’ve been automatically disabled, it’s an odd sensation that was in issue with the first iteration of the device as well.
 
It’s strange that Lenovo didn’t include the same “Lift and Lock” keyboard set-up as the freshly unveiled ThinkPad Yoga, which recesses the keyboard automatically into the laptop body as it is flipped into tablet mode. However, Lenovo claims that it was a choice made to keep the Yoga 2 Pro slim and lightweight.
 
The Yoga 2 Pro also has a relocated the power button to the side of the device, rather than the front. The Windows home screen is also now a touch button instead of a physical one.
 
There’s a new rubber rim around the outside of the laptop too, helping it to stay upright and grip surfaces when in tent mode.

 Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro – Screen

Lenovo has improved the screen on the original model, offering a 13-inch 3,200 x 1,800p Full HD display that has four times the resolution and brightness of the Yoga. That resolution puts the Yoga 2 Pro up against the MacBook Pro Retina, Google Chromebook Pixel and Samsung Ativ Book 9 Plus. Vibrant and vivid, the screen on the Yoga 2 Pro has a great colour contrast that makes it great for watching HD content.

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro – Features

The Yoga 2 Pro features the 4th generation Intel Core processors up to the i7 and a maximum 8GB of RAM and 512GB SSD. On paper it is much more powerful that the previous iteration, and we’d be interested to see how it performs in our full review.
 
Lenovo has included new features in the Yoga 2 Pro, such as Lenovo Picks, which offers up apps based on the position the laptop hybrid is in. For example, Lenovo Picks would suggest Skype or Netflix when in Stand Mode, as you get full view of the screen.
 
There’s Lenovo Camera Man for photographic filters, Lenovo Photo Touch for editing pictures and a recipe app called Lenovo Chef. This is designed for those that use their hybrid when cooking. It offers up recipes and lets you browse through and follow instructions via voice and motion control.
 
Phone Companion is another new addition, letting you send documents and other content to a smartphone via text message, but only when you’re in laptop mode.

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro
 

First Impressions

We’re intrigued to know how much the Yoga 2 Pro will retail for in the UK, but seeing as it’s priced at €1,100 in Europe, expect it to be around £1,000 here. But, with such a great screen and improved design, we think Lenovo is onto a serious winner here.

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