Awards

  • Recommended by TR
Dyson DC59

Summary

Our Score

9/10

User Score

Pros

  • Versatile cleaning capabilities
  • Powerful V6 motor
  • Useful trigger system and boost mode

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Small dust capacity

Best Deals

Review Price £349.99

What is the Dyson DC59?

The Dyson DC59 is the opposite of the typical bulky, floor-bound vacuum cleaners most people know and… probably don’t love. It’s cordless with a claimed 20-minute battery life, it’s light enough to handle singlehandedly and it’s flexible enough to reach awkward corners, clean the carpets and use in your car. At least, that’s the idea, but does the Dyson DC59 really deliver on all these promises, improve upon the Dyson DC34 it follows and justify its hefty £350 price tag? It’s a tough ask.

Dyson DC59

Dyson DC59: Design

On looks alone, it certainly does. Dyson has done something pretty special with the DC59 – it’s made a vacuum cleaner look not only smart and distinguished, but given it a sense of style and allure normally reserved for fashionable gadgets like the iPhone 5S. This isn’t the sort of unsightly vacuum you want out of sight in a cupboard; it is as much a carefully designed, aesthetically pleasing gadget as a cleaning product.

Dyson has paid attention to the practical details, too. Rather than a dumb on/off switch button, it has a power trigger. This ensures you don’t use more power than you need, extending the battery as far as possible. It makes it fun to use, too.

The Dyson DC59 isn’t too hard on your wrist or back, either. It weighs just two kilos (about the same most laptops), which makes it easy to tilt it to the ceiling or reach tight corners with minimal strain. It’s incredibly well-balanced, too, which makes it easier to handle than if the weight were biased too low or high.

Our only small complaint is the number of scuff marks and blemishes the motorised cleaning head has after just a couple of weeks of use. It’s not a critical problem, but we expect a little more hardiness at this price.

SEE ALSO: Best Washing Machines 2014

Dyson DC59

Dyson DC59: Features

Versatility is the Dyson DC59 stock in trade, so it makes sense it comes with plenty of attachments. The main one is a motorised cleaning head for normal carpets, but it uses more power so there’s a standard non-motorised one as well in addition to the crevice tool and bristled extension for those more delicate areas.

All of these attachments fit either directly to the body, or at the end of the one-metre rigid extension, which means the Dyson DC59 comfortably doubles as a handheld vacuum (for car interiors, table tops etc.) and a standard vacuum for normal housework.

The Dyson DC59 is the latest Dyson to feature its ‘two tier’ cyclone suction system. We first saw it in the Dyson DC49 and its benefits are clear in the DC59, too. It helps filter out even the smallest particles of dust, and during testing we experienced no seepage of fine dust.

While we love DC59’s versatility and dexterity, its most practical feature is the neat wall mounted docking station. The dock, which screws into the wall, is a brilliant addition that stores and charges the vacuum, and holds two cleaning attachments. It’s useful so that you don’t forget to charge the DC59 between cleans – an important point considering the 20-minute battery life.

Although the claimed 20-minute Dyson DC59 battery life doesn’t sound that impressive, in practice it’s more than ample for a couple of full sweeps of a moderately sized two-bedroom house. The trigger system is key here as you never leave it running unnecessarily, which makes the difference between the DC59’s battery life and the 40-minute cleaning time of the Gtech Air Ram less pronounced.

With all this said, it does reinforce the fact the Dyson DC59 is really a vacuum cleaner for smaller households. Its size and nimble design make it ideal for small houses and flats, but it’s a tight limit to clean a large family house in 20 minutes – not least as the dust capacity is quite limited, more on which in a moment.

Next page
comments powered by Disqus