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Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle Review

Verdict

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Some want their minimalist kettle to merge into the background, but for others, it’s the star of the kitchen. If you fall into the latter category, you’ll love Tower’s Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle. It’s unashamedly a statement small appliance, from the rose gold detailing to the smooth matte finish. The high minimum boil capacity of 800ml is disappointing, though.

Pros

  • Easy clean matt finish
  • Boils up to 7 cups
  • Removable limescale filter

Cons

  • Hard to measure how much water is being boiled
  • Uneconomical 800ml minimum boil
  • Exposed element

Availability

  • UKRRP: £39.99

The Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle is the perfect choice for indulging your inner maximalist. A contemporary update of a classic shape, it has every flourish you could wish for – mixed metallic details of chrome and rose gold, a fingerprint-proof matte finish in midnight blue, black, grey or pink, a large power switch that lights up when it’s on, and a host of coordinating breakfast kit from toasters to mug trees and canisters. The biggest issue is its large minimum fill of 800ml – it won’t be economical over its lifespan, if you usually boil water for a single cup at a time.

  • Minimum fill may boil more water than needed
  • Large, obvious illuminated power switch
  • Few markings on water window

While some dome or pyramid kettles err on the side of tradition for design, Tower’s Cavaletto is thoroughly modern. Everything about its appearance feels sleek, from the gently curving C-shaped handle at the top, to the multiple metallic details that adorn it.

It’s fairly lightweight to fill, and although taking the lid off to do so before replacing it is a faff, it comes off easily and fits snugly back on. Inside, there’s an exposed element, which may require attention when descaling, plus a removable, sturdy limescale filter that’s made with metal mesh – meaning it should last longer than those constructed entirely from plastic.

Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle element

Where it could do better is with regards to being able to see how much water is in the kettle. While the window isn’t obscured by the handle, it’s a victim of minimal markings. Not only are there no cup measurements displayed, there are only three markers for litres.

Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle fill level

These are the minimum of 800ml, maximum of 1.7 litres and – confusingly –1.25 litres, with no marker for the more useful measurement of a litre. This means you’ll need to keep a jug nearby if you want to boil exact amounts, or familiarise yourself with what a litre looks like. The other issue is that 800ml is a lot for a minimum fill, especially if you usually need water for only one or two cups.

What I did especially like, though, was the power switch. It’s large and brightly illuminated when on, so you can see from a distance if you’ve accidentally knocked the kettle on.

Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle boiling
  • Easy to pour from but fast flowing
  • One litre boils in 2mins 23secs
  • Full kettle boils in 4 minutes

Cavaletto’s shape may be reminiscent of a stove-top kettle, but its performance is far better. It boiled a litre of water from cold in 2mins 23secs thanks to its 3kW element, and its maximum capacity of 1.7 litres in 4 minutes – which is a little slower than some, but still respectable for cooking, cleaning or a round of drinks.

Note that the lid does become hot during boiling, however, so if you’re boiling kettle after kettle, you’ll need to ensure you don’t burn your fingers with steam while taking it off.

Pyramid kettles often have a wide spout and Tower’s Cavaletto kettle is no different. Trying to pour a slow stream of water – into a hot water bottle, for example – requires practice. However, it was drip-free in testing and good for fast-pouring into a pan or bucket.

Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle spout

Pouring out the whole kettle leaves a small amount of water behind – I found it difficult to completely empty it each time.

A stylish kettle that’s well priced, the Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle certainly makes a statement. Its high minimum boil capacity of 800ml is a little disappointing. As such, you may be better off with the cheaper (but still stylish) Salter EK3643GRG Pyramid Kettle, or choosing something different from our list of the best kettles.

Should you buy it?

The Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle is right for you if you want a kettle that will stand out on the worktop and be a conversation point with guests. It has a large capacity and is available in a choice of matte colours while still being fairly affordable.

The Tower Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle might not be right for you if you value convenience over style. It’s a little fiddly to fill as the lid has to be removed and replaced rather than flipped up, and it has a high 800ml minimum boil.

Verdict

Some want their minimalist kettle to merge into the background, but for others, it’s the star of the kitchen. If you fall into the latter category, you’ll love Tower’s Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle. It’s unashamedly a statement small appliance, from the rose gold detailing to the smooth matte finish. The high minimum boil capacity of 800ml is disappointing, though.

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FAQs

What’s the minimum boil of the Cavaletto Pyramid Kettle?

You have to put at least 800ml of water in to use the kettle, which is quite high, particularly if you’re regularly making only a single hot drink.

Specifications

UK RRP
Manufacturer
Size (Dimensions)
ASIN
First Reviewed Date
Model Number
Water capacity
Kettle type
Integrated filter
Cordless

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