The Samsung Galaxy S11 could have this 64-megapixel camera sensor

The world of smartphone cameras doesn’t seem to stand still for very long, and it looks like the Galaxy Note 10 will have a big advantage over the already excellent S10. Samsung has revealed two new camera sensors for handsets launching this autumn and beyond.

 

The ISOCELL Bright GW1 is a 64-megapixel camera sensor, which comfortably beats the current trend of 48-megapixels seen in rival flagships. Samsung claims that that while the resolution is higher, the pixel size remains at 0.8μm. The company also has its own 48-megapixel solution: the ISOCELL Bright GM2.

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“Over the past few years, mobile phone cameras have become the main instrument for recording and sharing our everyday moments,” said Samsung’s Yongin Park in a press release. “With more pixels and advanced pixel technologies, Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and GM2 will bring a new level of photography to today’s sleekest mobile devices that will enhance and help change the way we record our daily lives.”

The GW1 uses Samsung’s Tetracell technology to blend data from four pixels into one, which should result in 16-megapixel snaps for tricky low-light scenes. The number of megapixels isn’t everything, of course, and the GW1 also supports real-time HDR of “up to 100-decibels”, which Samsung says beats the current average of 60dB while coming closer to the human eye’s 120dB.

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It all sounds very promising, but we’ll have to see for ourselves when the first units ship with the new camera sensors enter the market later this year. It’ll almost certainly power the Note 10, but be on the lookout for Chinese smartphone manufacturers adopting the GW1 and GM2 as an alternative to the tried and tested Sony sensors, too.

Does this new sensor make the Note 10 sound more appealing? Let us know on Twitter: @TrustedReviews.

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