The dictionary now defines Apple fanboys as ‘sheeple’

Are you one of the Apple loyalists who waits around the block for the latest iPhone regardless of the reviews? Well the Merriam-Webster dictionary officially has a word for you: sheeple.

Among the latest additions to the dictionary is the popular portmanteau for people and sheep, and it’s not too kind to patrons of the world’s fruitiest tech firm.

In the definition, the word describes “people who are docile, compliant, or easily influenced : people likened to sheep.”

Related: iPhone 8

But the usage context offered by the dictionary features an insult to those who love nothing more than taking the wrappers off a brand new Apple accessory, regardless of the price or usefulness.

“Apple’s debuted a battery case for the juice-sucking iPhone—an ungainly lumpy case the sheeple will happily shell out $99 for,” the quote attributed to a Doug Criss reads.

How rude.

https://twitter.com/statuses/857619516620189701

The quote has naturally been met with ire from the very folks who have helped Apple become, at various points in time, the richest company on earth.

Dustin Ravizé in Las Vegas rages: “This is disgusting, complete disrespect to people who use Apple’s technology to enrich their lives and the ones around them.”

Bill Baz argues: “The word should not be defined by using a quote against a single company. Very derogatory.”

While Caleb Kingston replies: “I actually think it helps me understand the word better.”

Touché, Caleb.

To be honest, Merriam-Webster is hardly the Oxford English Dictionary, so Apple fans shouldn’t take that much notice.

Are you affronted by the definition? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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