Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

BenQ X2200W 22in LCD Monitor - BenQ X2200W

As it is, though, you'll have to do without and you'll also have to do without any real adjustability, with no swivel base and only a standard level of tilt available. It's a little frustrating, truth be told, to find a supposedly premium product lacking in such a basic department and though we've become quite accustomed to not seeing height adjustment on 22in LCDs, no swivel capability is somewhat galling.

Thankfully, the BenQ X2200W does make up for this in its styling. Housed in a graphite grey plastic casing similar to that of the Iiyama ProLite B2403WS, it instantly looks and feels classy, especially compared to the glossy but rather cheap feeling LG Flatron L227WT-PF. It has a nice slim bezel and OSD buttons are tucked away on the right edge, with only the power button on the front to interrupt the otherwise minimalist aesthetic.
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Speaking of the OSD, one can often tolerate poor OSDs if you seldom delve into them, but that doesn't make it any less annoying when you're confronted by a puzzling set of unintelligible symbols. No such problems exist here. BenQ's OSD is attractive and easy to use, with a consistent navigation system aided by clear and easy to read labels for each OSD control button. It's all very straightforward.

And, as you explore the OSD, you'll discover a nice variety of options. Naturally, brightness and contrast controls are present, while you can adjust each colour setting individually. You can also use the colour presets of Bluish, Reddish and Normal and though we'd sooner see proper colour space options (i.e. 6500k, 9300k etc), it's not an issue worth worrying about too much. Also accessible from the OSD are a selection of picture modes, which can also be selected directly via one of the OSD buttons.
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Your choice includes Movie, Dynamics, Photo, Action Game and Racing Game modes and though they exhibit clear differences, none provide a conclusive case of their worth. Movie mode does what is typical of most movie modes, boosting contrast and colours but creating a somewhat stilted image that's not very attractive and lacks detail. Likewise, the Dynamics and Photo modes add similar effects at varying degrees of severity, without ever improving image quality to our eyes.

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