Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

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Owners of Yamaha AV receivers who want to keep their Blu-ray player ‘in the family’ might like to check out the company’s latest entry-level deck, which is designed to match its audio gear both aesthetically and electronically. Instead of dazzling you with a list of cutting-edge features, its aim is simply to provide high-quality hi-def pictures to accompany those scintillating Blu-ray sounds.

The BD-S1900 is one of two players in the company’s current range – both have very similar-looking spec sheets and designs, but the more expensive BD-S1065 purports to offer even better picture and sound quality. Contrary to the general trend of larger product numbers denoting models higher up a product range.

Anyone familiar with Yamaha’s previous AV products will know what to expect aesthetically – straight lines, a stylish jet-black finish and an orange LED panel up front. It might not push the boat out but will delight enthusiasts who want their disc players to look like disc players, not ornaments. They’ll also be encouraged by the excellent build quality, which makes the bodywork feel sturdy and vibration-resistant.

Around the back the prognosis is positive. Most significantly you get a set of 7.1-channel analogue outputs, which is quite common among players at this sort of price but not in the budget bracket. It means you can sample the hi-res delights of Dolby True HD and DTS HD Master Audio soundtracks even if your receiver hails from the pre-HDMI era.

Of course, owners of more up-to-date audio kit can transfer HD bit-streams along an HDMI cable, as well as sending a 1080/24p video signal to your display. You’ll also find component and composite video outputs, alongside the unusual sight of an S-video output, which is as useful here as a fuel tank in an electric car. Audio connectivity is completed by optical and coaxial digital outputs and analogue stereo output, while custom installers can make use of the remote control ports.

Naturally the BD-S1900 is a Profile 2.0 player, but can only connect to the internet using the Ethernet port on the rear, which already feels old-fashioned in the days of Wi-Fi enabled players. There’s also no sign of any network streaming, which would have increased the deck’s multimedia potential.

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