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PlayStation Move - Hardware cont.

By Stuart Andrews


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Review Price £40.99

However, there are some problems. For Move to work, you also need to plug-in the PlayStation Eye and position it on or under your TV, pointing the lens where you’re going to stand or sit. As the Eye’s thick USB cable has a nasty habit of pulling the camera out of position, this isn’t as easy as it sounds, and you may have to find ways of securing it in place. What's more, the Eye - at least in some games – seems to limit who can play them.

Even with the camera set to its wide-angle mode, it's difficult to get adults and smaller children in the frame at the same time in an average sized room; something that won’t matter to the hardcore gamer, but might affect families with younger kids. There are also issues with lighting. Some games seem more sensitive than others, but to play, say, Sports Champions, we had to close curtains or switch off certain wall lights. These issues don't crop up with the infra-red based Wii.

Still, one good thing about Move is its sheer flexibility. You can play most games with just the one controller, but some support two for added realism, and shooters and action games will support a nunchuck-style Navigation controller (which we’ve yet to receive samples of) to handle movement. If you don’t want to invest in this, however, you don’t have to: Move will also partner with a standard Dual Shock 3 controller if need be.

Calibration differs from game to game. In Sports Champions, for example, you calibrate the controller(s) before each event, holding the glowing bulb at your side, your shoulder and your belt buckle in turn. Other titles, like Start the Party and Kung-Fu Rider, ask you just to point the controller at the screen and press Move. In either case it’s not difficult, and Move seems to need less frequent recalibrating than the MotionPlus-enhanced Wii.

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Tim Sutton

September 8, 2010, 9:09 pm

I'm not sure what defines a hardcore gamer, but none of my console owning friends have any intention of buying Move or Kinnect. Annoyed derision at their chosen console trying to be the Wii would be closer to the mark than excited optimism at motion control.

I can't see a 'killer app' coming along to change their minds either. Move and Kinnect are likely to be doomed to a life of iPhone game ports and lip-service motion control options in other games. Certainly if I was a publisher I wouldn't invest in a AAA game primarily designed to work with a add-on that the vast majority of my potential customer base won't have.

I'd imagine the idea is to refine the technology so its ready to be implemented out of the box with the next generation of consoles.. 3D control coupled with 3D visuals makes a lot of sense. This time around? For an extra £100 for multi-player? For casual games? When the Wii has the sector covered? Meh level 8.

Clarke Douglas

September 8, 2010, 11:36 pm

I'd have to agree with Tim, on every point. Its not really what hardcore gamers want at all.if you are a hardcore gamer and already have a wii, i cant see why you would be tempted by the move or kinect. similarly i couldnt see casual gamers who own already own a ps3 buying into it. its a fairly expensive add on. who actually owns the ps eye? i doubt most ps3 owners do, so its more like 45 quid for 1 move controller and the camera, and an extra 30 for a second controller. Also as is already stated in the article, its not like its boxed with wii sports or anything.


September 9, 2010, 12:35 am

I give it a 9/10

I played Socom 4 and its fantastic, move is very good for core games and hardcore gamers who want a different experience ala Wiimote with better graphics, will love it.

also i find move more accurate than other motion controls on the market.

buying this day one.


September 9, 2010, 12:45 am

Surprised the review didn't pick up more on the price. If you have nothing and want two people to play then you will need: Starter Kit + one controller (£75). Most of the interesting demos show people using two of the main controllers so there is another £65 (£135). If you want the "navigation" controller as well that is another 2x£18 (£171). Oh, and you will probably want a game as well to play. Call it £200 shall we? Oh sorry, you will probably want some charge kits aswell. OK, I lost count now ;-)

There there is what will games actually require to play them: 1 ping pong ball controller, 2 ping pong ball controllers or 1 ping pong ball + 1 navigation controller??? Too confusing for the general public I would say.

My gut feel is that I think it is doomed to failure!

Not sure Kinect will fair much better, but at least it is obvious what you will beed to buy - and ironically could work out a lot cheaper.


September 9, 2010, 12:49 am

Hardcore gamers or not these sort of things still have huge appeal for those who still enjoy their "games nights" with their mates (big kids!). I NEVER play the Wii unless I happen to have 3 of my mates round for a session indoors and we get the gaming on the go. Move would, in theory, improve the experience with better graphics and sharper gameplay but from early reports the games are stinking for Move at the moment.

On the other hand, with Kinect, I totally cant see past the gimmick at the moment. I see the potential as some sort of controller but for gaming I think Id feel like an even bigger clown playing games than I would with the Wii/Move


September 9, 2010, 1:23 am

Is the Move still limited to the number of controllers (and/or the ancillary remote) it can use? I thought the Wii use a wired nunchuk to get around Bluetooth's limited number of simultaneous connections?

alex 9

September 9, 2010, 1:30 am

As a 'hardcore' gamer (of sorts) I am inclined to agree.

However perhaps its the recent hype, but just recently I have begun to experience a curiosity for this and Kinect. I suspect this is also partly due to my latent desire to own all new technology. (I'm trying to ignore this urge).

I do find myself wondering though whether my 2yr old son might like it. Flimsy excuse perhaps to justify the expenditure, but I wonder how many other people will change their minds once the thing is out and being demonstrated in the shops.

Incidentally reading this review makes me realise that my 2yr old son is certainly too young to adopt 'Move'. But just maybe.. he might be able to enjoy Kinect....


September 9, 2010, 3:08 am


Videogamer.com have a weekly podcast, this week they talked a lot about Move and it's misgivings. They answered your question in the podcast, if I remember it was no, players take turns with no Wii like 4 player madness.

Surprised with the 8/10, the launch line up is pretty underwhelming, sports mingames which don't come close to its rival, the gladiator game looks to have been faked @ E3 last year or they have released a buggy game, looks nowhere near as smooth as the first reveal. Sony appear to have spent more time on glowing orbs than button configuration. Must be the Tiger Woods factor to give an 8/10. Sony should have taken more time, obsessed with beating MS to a release.


September 9, 2010, 3:22 am

I just don't see why everything needs to revolve around 'hardcore gamers' like they're the be all and end all of the industry. The PS3 already has them well covered. Now they're trying to expand the appeal of the console and there's nothing wrong with that, as the Wii and iPhone prove willing casual-to moderate gamers exist in abundance.

It's a rather unpleasant artistic elitism that's developing where cultural snobs are deciding Angry Birds is demonstrably less of a game than, say, MGS 4, which is like saying Toy Story is less of a film than 2001. They do different things, and just because they're not equally complicated or dense doesn't make one of intrinsically less value. Then again, maybe that means the medium has come of age as an artform, and soon we'll have the gamers' equivalent of The Review Show on, so tech journalists can tell us why Duke Nukem : Forever doesn't quite have as many Aristotelian dilemmas as Bioshock 2.


September 9, 2010, 12:14 pm

Wasn't at all bothered about Move until I read this Digital Foundry article: http://www.eurogamer.net/artic...

Still not gonna buy it yet but I can finally see the potential.


September 9, 2010, 1:53 pm

@GoldenGuy I agree with some of your points, however you can't compare Angry Birds to MGS4. One you play for a couple of minutes when traveling etc, the other you set aside hours to master.

Move looks interesting like the review says it needs that killer game then it will sell. All of my old COD clan have Eye Toys to communicate in game with, So suspect there are a lot out there.


September 9, 2010, 2:19 pm


Here here. I've been playing games since I was a wee teen (C64) and I've never classed myself as a hardcore gamer. In fact what is a hardcore gamer? One that swears a lot and curses your mother? No thanks. I like games, some of which are the plants vs Zombie type and others are the GTA's of the world.

But the article has got it right, it wasn't the hardware that sold the wii, it was the accessibility of the software and the family friendly wii sports.


September 9, 2010, 4:36 pm

@Goldenguy - fantastic post. Having played games since I got to grips with my old mans Amstra 1640 some 20 years ago now I have to say Im getting a little fed up with the hardcore gamer tag.

I used to play games for hours on end up until the tail end of my uni days. Now, I actually cant be arsed putting 40+ hours into a game these days unless its Footy Manager (which I managed to put 40+ DAYS into in its 2008 year). But I still consider myself an avid gamer who is forever interested in new gaming experiences.

I actually put more time into Angry Birds than I ever did into MGS4. Not because I could play it when travelling, more down to enjoyment.

Tim Sutton

September 9, 2010, 7:15 pm


Like I said, I've no idea what a hardcore gamer is. And I don't know anyone with a bad thing to say about Angry Birds or Flight Control.

But I also don't know anyone who wants to spend £200 on a console and an extra £100 on motion control peripherals just to play them. They'll buy a Wii or, y'know, pay £3 to play them on a phone.

And do you honestly think that Angry Birds has as much creative content as MGS4 or Mario Galaxy? I'm not saying Angry Birds is bad in the slightest, but to use your analogy Angry Birds isn't Toy Story compared to 2001, it's half an episode of The Simpsons compared to 2001.


September 9, 2010, 8:04 pm

@Tim Sutton - I'm curious. Can I ask what your take on Tetris is then? My point being some of the finest games of all time have been simple ones. And keeping with the movie/game analogy the same can be said for movies too - Pixar being a fine example of simplicity and perfection.


September 9, 2010, 9:08 pm

Cheers Jones, cos that's the other better comparison I now thought of.

@ Tim Sutton

If it's a bad analogy, then replace Angry Birds with that... Tetris. Whatever - pick the extremely successful, simple game of your choice. There's an undeniable high art/low art divide being drawn, slating games just for being simple, no matter how effective they are to gamers like Jones who don't think enjoyable gameplay is necessarily contingent on narrative or character development or any other storytelling tropes. Gaming may have a lot to contribute to and revolutionise in the art of storytelling, but not all gamers feel comfortable with this being the medium's overarching objective - they're looking at the elements involved in gameplay itself (strategy, timing, addictiveness, etc.) as the main aim, to be found in forms that have nothing to do with the popular strategy of devising an interactive extended Hollywood film. Yet that appears to be the definition that this demographic wants to restrict most of gaming to. I think many would be quite right to object to those limitations.

Now I have no idea whether Move will inspire more accessible games to come to the PS3 and I won't be the first to defend Sony's prices (their track record on launch pricing is appalling, though I consider the PS3 to have eventually turned into great value for money with this peripheral extending its range even further). Thing is, it's not about the money. The hardcore gaming elite would object to this so called dumbing down whatever the price. They're worried these other gamers are going to steal too much time away from Sony developing 'proper games' for them. They're not the only people that should have a chance to play on the PS3.

Tim Sutton

September 10, 2010, 5:07 pm


Honestly, I've no problem with simple games. I've spent far too much time on Desktop Tower Defence et al to ever dream of dismissing them. But they're a great bonus to having a device, not a reason to buy the device in the first place. I wouldn't buy a PC if all it could do was play Spider Solitaire, no matter how many games of it I play on my existing machines.

Tetris was a huge system seller for Nintendo because its simplicity was a perfect fit for the simple hardware at the time. Imagine if it was released for the first time today. I don't think gamers raised on Professor Layton and Phoenix Wright would be rushing out to buy a DS just to play Tetris.

I'd also disagree that Pixar films are in any way simple by the way :-)


I'm not getting at simple games, honestly! I *like* simple games. No snobbery here whatsoever. I'm just not ever going to pay £100s for a device just to play them.

Actually, I should have said £100s for ANOTHER device just to play them. The Wii, PCs and phones are perfect for casual, simple games already.

No-ones going to buy a PS3 or a 360 just so they can then buy Move or Kinnect to play casual party games. It's just not going to happen, you could buy a Wii and a DS instead and have better casual party games for the same money.

These products will live or die based on the interest of core gamers who already have the consoles, whether you like their opinions on casual gaming or not. And in my personal experience of talking to friends and going on pre-order figures, they're just not interested.

It's going to take a specifically designed major core game to drive interest in Kinnect and Move, and I just can't see that happening. The user base won't ever be there to make investing in such a game viable.

Damn, long post. And I haven't even had a go at Apple. W00t.

Nick Hustak

September 10, 2010, 7:52 pm

@Tim - I disagree, at least mostly. I agree - the Move isn't going to bring in casual gamers. However, that is exactly where the Kintect is aimed. I find the whole Move vs Kinect thing amusing - the fanbois refuse to see past their console and the hard core gamers refuse to see past what they want to play. This is about selling new ones - bear in mind the Wii still has nearly twice the sales of PS3 & 360.

The reality is these people already OWN consoles (for the record, I own all three and don't particularly favor one over the other - honestly my PC wins) Sony and M$ are engaged in an interesting fight and we'll see how it goes.

Personally, I'm interested in the move for the possiblity of some decent light gun games (the Wii just ain't that great at it) as well as hoping to finally have some mouse-like moving on a console. The Kinect opens up some interesting things for RPGs and stuff.

I do find this interesting - I asked my wife to pick which one she wanted to get first. Bear in mind she hardly plays on the consoles. I explained them both to her in detail. There was no question in her mind - Kinect.

And that I think is where the rub lies. The current non-gamers are going to be more intersted in 'simple' than controllers. Once you show them two moves, two navigators, etc, it's just a turn off. We'll see how it goes

Chris F

September 14, 2010, 6:02 pm

I am just waiting for the day they bring out the FPS wireless gun controller to use with the PS3 and FPS' like Modern Warefare 2. Now that I would buy ;) The Move in the meantime is just not floating my boat!

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