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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 - Test shots: Detail and Lens Performance

By Gavin Stoker


  • Recommended by TR
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2


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Review Price £739.00

A more general selection of test shots are revealed on this page and next to act as an evaluation of the GH2 in a variety of shooting conditions and with different lenses attached, as detailed.


An image taken with the optional 100-300mm telephoto zoom at its widest, 200mm equivalent, setting. Good edge to edge sharpness, bags of detail and lush colours straight out of the camera - no complaints here.


And by way of contrast an image taken with the same lens from the same vantage point, but this time at maximum zoom (600mm equivalent in 35mm terms). Handheld too, but still impressively sharp.


For comparison this shot was taken with the 14-140mm (28-280mm equivalent) lens from the same vantage point, and at maximum wideangle setting. The white balance here appears slightly thrown by the huge expanse of green in the foreground and there's a slightly washed out appearance.


And the same 14-140mm lens, this time at full zoom, and for us with displaying results much improved. Again handheld and again displaying plenty of detail, particularly visible in the brickwork.


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February 14, 2011, 2:53 pm

Please improve your iso tests. They let down the reviews.


February 14, 2011, 6:18 pm

14mm at the wide end is excellent for a kit lens :)

Lets face it, a lot of people that buy DSLRs never upgrade from the kit lens so the greater its range the better. On the other hand, are they giving people less reasons to upgrade their lenses this way (shooting themselves in the profit foot)?


February 14, 2011, 8:13 pm

@PoisonJam: This is 14mm on micro four thirds which equates to 28mm.

Geoff Richards

February 14, 2011, 8:31 pm

Yes, Micro Four Thirds has a crop factor of roughly 2, so the 14-140mm f/4-5.8 zoom as reviews has a full-frame / 35mm equivalent of 28-280mm. If you own a Canon dSLR with a crop factor of 1.6 (essentially everything from 7D all the way down to the 1000D) then this lens is the equivalent of roughly 18-175mm (the closest Canon lens would be the Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens)


February 15, 2011, 6:35 am

I agree that the ISO tests are poor in this review. It may be better to have a standardised subject and use it unfailingly. Some people would like to compare images from different cameras and this cannot be done when the subject and ligting differ.

Other than that, another very good review.

Cheers, Peter


February 15, 2011, 7:23 am

I agree, the ISO sample is a tad on the poor side. I know Cliff used to use his own which would be useful to replicate in newer reviews. Maybe a bit more contrast (in colour and lighting) in the shot to show ISO performance over darker and lighter areas respectively?


February 17, 2011, 2:56 am

I dont see why the image quality should be good for 9 points, its a bit hazy, think these are no better then Canon G12


February 18, 2011, 9:41 pm

I enjoyed this review and found it pretty comprehensive. My only criticism is that you said how good your shots of a swan in flight were but did not show these. I think some good action shots would show more of the camera capability than a static object like the house.


March 7, 2012, 1:47 pm

I bought Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 after I read this review. However, I never knew the AVCHD MTS videos from this cam could not be edited directly in my Avid Media Composer 5.

I then searched on the Internet and found a video converter program called Aunsoft Video Converter. This program can convert the AVCHD files to the Avid DNxHD codec in MOV format. The converted MOV file can then be supported very nice in MC 5.

Just share this information here and hope this could help others somehow.

A good cam though.

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