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Huawei: We are still committed to Windows Phone but dual OS is better

Luke Johnson by

Huawei W1
More Huawei Windows Phone handsets are incoming

With the Windows Phone platform continuing to increase its market share, Huawei has pledged its continued support to Microsoft’s mobile OS.

However, despite discussing its future Windows Phone support, Chinese manufacturer Huawei has claimed that WP8 is a better prospect when offered alongside Android as a part of a dual OS device.

We are still committed to making Windows Phone devices,” Shao Yang, Huawei’s Chief Marketing Officer said speaking exclusively with TrustedReviews.

Although throwing backing behind the growing Windows Phone brand, Yang revealed that Microsoft’s OS will continue to play a lowly second fiddle to Android.

He stated: “Compared with Android, the priority of Windows Phone is much lower but is still one of our choices of OS. We are definitely using a multi OS strategy.”

Looking to how it hopes to improve its Windows Phone 8 support, Yang has claimed that dual OS handsets could make the device more appealing to a wider consumer base.

With Windows Phone, one direction for us – and one that we are now following – is dual OS. Dual OS as in Android and Windows together,” he told us.

The Huawei exec added: “If it is Windows only, maybe people will not find it as easy a decision to buy the phone. If they have the Android and Windows together, you can change it as you wish and it is much easier for people to choose Windows Phone.

“We think the dual OS can be a new choice for the consumer. It will be on sale in the US in Q2.”

Having become the world’s third largest smartphone manufacturer in recent months, Huawei has suggested that it will not overlook any opportunity to further expand its smartphone offerings.

Although backing Android and Windows Phone 8, the manufacturer has suggested it will continue to monitor further operating systems and pursue others when the time is right.

“We are definitely looking at other platforms,” Yang said. “For any new operating system we are open to. We need to watch every OS.”

Discussing specifics he stated: “I think on this partner (Tizen) we are not very clear.”

Read More: Best Smartphones 2014

Go to comments

Tim Sutton

March 13, 2014, 10:33 am

That means paying two sets of licensing fees for each handset though, the hardware will need to be pretty low end and cheap to compensate for that extra cost.

I'm all in favour of people being given the chance to try Windows Phone though as I think it's the best mobile OS out there.

mange

March 13, 2014, 3:45 pm

Microsoft is just Evil

make the nokia lamia phones dual boot with Android !!

Tim Sutton

March 13, 2014, 4:36 pm

You seem to be confused.

Microsoft are a technology company. Hitler was evil. One of them caused the death of millions, the other sells communication and productivity products.

You might be more at home on a Youtube comment thread than on a technology website. Just an idea.

RATBURL

March 13, 2014, 4:41 pm

No it's not better,why even bother?

Tim Sutton

March 13, 2014, 4:55 pm

I would say WP was objectively better than Android. I use both throughout the day and WP is just nicer. It's always a bit of a wrench to go back to a grid of dead icons when I have to use my tablet rather than my phone, using Android after WP feels like going back in time 5 years.

But I don't really see the benefit of dual-booting Android and Windows Phone on a phone either.

The only thing I can think of that I might use it for is that there isn't a native Sonos remote app yet for Windows Phone, but there's no way I'd want to reset my phone to boot into Android everytime I wanted to change the volume in my living room.

mamemame187

March 13, 2014, 9:24 pm

"lamia"

SingHoMing

March 14, 2014, 12:57 am

Dude really doesnt have a clue one way or the other.
Anon-Works dot Com

Ignat

March 14, 2014, 2:21 pm

A dual boot phone of any brand will make a serious dent in the market for now. The future will probably entail cloud accessible os systems of choice or a hybrid combination of both for devices utilizing virtual productivity platforms–holographic / laser driven keyboards and screens–just before phone handsets dinosaur.
I'm still waiting for a phablet which could run a full ms office program, which's all I'd ever really need.

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