Fontus is a water bottle that makes water from thin air

You’re out having adventures when you run out of water miles from a source. What to do? The Fontus water bottle eliminates the problem, as it makes drinkable water out of air and light.

So how does it work? A small fan draws in air, which is then run through a special filter and pressed into the condensation chambers. Powered by solar energy, a series of small coolers makes the moisture within the air condense. The resulting water then drops into the bottle’s main body and is stored.

The water is drinkable and completely safe, thanks to capsules that remineralise it.

The bottle comes in two versions. The Fontus Airo is the standard model, while the Fontus Ryde is the version made especially for bikes – it clips onto your bike frame, and has its solar panel on the top, facing the sun.

Instead of a fan, the Ryde uses the air stream you generate while cycling to suck in air.

Read more: Trago: The connected, smart water bottle

Not only could these be useful for adventurers and those exploring the great outdoors, they could also help provide water in the developing world. The only problem is the price.

At the moment, the Fontus Airo costs $200 (£142) on an early bird, which is mighty steep for a water bottle. The Ryde starts at $165 (£117), which is a little cheaper, but not much. It’s smashed its funding goal of $30,000 and still has a month to go. It’ll ship in April next year.