Home / News / Games News / Commodore 64 reborn as 21st century retro handheld

Commodore 64 reborn as 21st century retro handheld

by

64
The reimagined '64'

Whether you used the long-departed Commodore 64 or not, we can all appreciate retro gaming.

A Kickstarter project has launched with the hope of bringing the legendary Commodore 64 computer of the 1980s back to life as a game console.

The device is being brought back to life as either a plug-in console or a handheld, depending on your preference at checkout. There’s also an optional joystick if you opt for the former.

The games haven’t been announced just yet, but the creators have promised “absolute retro game classics” and “some all-new games”.

64

“The 64 is an exciting and respectful re-imaging of the original home computer, the Commodore C64,” writes Darren Melbourne, creator of the 64 project.

Melborune continues: “The 64 project is being designed, built and marketed by a team of people who are utterly passionate about the Commodore 64 and retro gaming.”

The computer console version costs $150 (or $175 with the joystick), while the handheld model costs $170.

Related: PS4 vs Xbox One

The original Commodore 64 was an 8-bit home computer that was launched in January 1982.

The Guinness World Records still ranks it as the highest-selling single computer model of all time – estimates put the figures at between 10 and 17 million units.

The computer retailed for $595 (around $1,500 today) and was eventually discontinued in April 1994.

The C64 used a MOS Technology processor clocked at either 1.023MHz or 0.985MHz, depending on your region. It also featured 64MB of RAM and 20KB of ROM.

Would you buy this modern reimagining of the Commodore 64? Let us know in the comments.

GJ

April 14, 2016, 5:27 pm

That should be 64KB of RAM - not 64MB

Bugblatter

April 14, 2016, 8:20 pm

That poll's a bit daft. Firstly it suggests that the only reason not to support Kickstarter projects is because you can't afford to. Secondly what's barley got to do with it?

comments powered by Disqus