Summary

Our Score

7/10

Pros

  • Good quality black text
  • Fast duplex print speed
  • Reasonable running costs

Cons

  • Only one extra tray
  • Not as fast as claimed
  • Some banding in graphics

Review Price £164.00

Key Features: Duplex print as standard; USB, Ethernet and parallel connections; 50-sheet multi-purpose tray; Instant-on fuser saves energy; 1,200dpi resolution

Manufacturer: Lexmark

Design and Features

Workhorse mono laser printers aren’t that exciting, but they’re still the mainstay of most offices, where a mix of business documents need printing every day.  Lexmark’s E360dn is a medium-footprint, duplex laser printer designed for this kind of work.

Decked out in a practical but uninspiring light and dark grey case, the printer has a chamfered front edge, into which a simple control panel is set. This has a 2-line by 16-character, backlit LCD display and six buttons for menu navigation and to abort current print jobs.
Lexmark E360dn - Controls
At the bottom of the front panel is a 250-sheet paper tray and there’s a rather cumbersome looking, 50-sheet multi-purpose tray that folds down and pulls out from above that. You can add a 250-sheet or a 500-sheet tray as an accessory, but only one extra tray can be fitted.

At the back are three sockets for USB, 10/100 Ethernet and parallel connections. The last of these is there to ensure minimum disruption in legacy installations.
Lexmark E360dn
Folding down the whole of the front panel gives access to the two-piece drum and toner cartridge. Locating the cartridge and sliding it into the printer is more awkward  than some rivals and you need to exert a fair amount of force to put it in place. Separating the drum from the toner cartridge is much easier and you can replace up to eight cartridges before the drum needs renewing.

Lexmark provides drivers for Windows and OS X and includes PCL and PostScript emulations. Linux support is available through a download for Linpus, Red Hat, Suse, Linspire, Debian, Red Flag and Ubuntu, a very good cross-section of distributions. There’s little other software, except a network monitor applet.

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