Best Beard Trimmers 2018: The finest beard groomers you can buy

This is why you should trust our list of the best beard trimmers:

best overall beard trimmer

BaByliss 7897U for Men Super Beard Lithium Beard Trimmer

The aptly named Super Beard is our pick for best overall beard trimmer, giving us the most even cut. A 60-minute battery life is also impressive. If you're looking for a beard trimmer to keep you looking neat and tidy, it's our recommendation.

£45
View deal
Our team of experts have been testing products since Trusted Reviews launched in 2003, making us the premier online destination for buying advice. We review thousands of products every year, letting us help you find the best kit, such as through this guide to the best beard trimmers.

We may make money if you buy a product through one of the links in this article. This means that we want you to be happy with your purchase, so that you return next time you want to buy something.

We’ve reviewed a whole host of beard trimmers, narrowing the list down to the four here that we’d recommend. Out of this list, two stand out. The Babyliss 7897U Super Beard is the best all-round beard trimmer that we’ve tested, with superb flexibility. If you’re on a tigher budget, the Remington MB4045 Beard Kit is a great choice.

How we pick the best beard trimmers

best value beard trimmer

Remington MB4045 Beard Kit (Beard Trimmer, Mixed Boar Bristle Beard Comb and Stainless Steel Scissors)

Considering how much you get for not a lot of money, this is our best value beard trimmer pick. You get a comb and scissors along with the beard trimmer itself, meaning you can get a refined look on a budget.

£28.99 / $52.84
View deal
Anyone relatively new to bearded life might try to use their existing electric shaver to keep things under control, but it’ll soon become clear that maintenance of your facial fuzz requires a specially designed tool, otherwise you run the risk of putting all that growing effort to waste.

We thoroughly tested each product on our own facial hair to get a fair comparison. For each product, we used each trimmer for a good all-over tidy-up after a few days’ growth. We looked at how evenly each one could cut, how easy it was to adjust for the required length, what attachments came with it, and how easy it was to clean.

Babyliss Super Beard 7897U

Pros:

  • Effective trimming with an even cut
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • No travel case
  • Left the odd stray hair

Seemingly named after the world’s most hirsute superhero, the Babyliss Super Beard does a pretty good job of living up to its moniker.

A lockable length adjustment that goes from 1mm up to 15mm means you can secure the comb guard in place before you start shearing, so there’s no chance of accidentally going clean-shaven. It works well, effectively raising hairs in order to trim them to a consistent length without reducing thickness. Of the trimmers that we’ve tested, the Super Beard gave us the most even cut.

Fixed in its lowest position the Super Beard cuts to about 1mm, although with the guard removed the cutting head is slightly too wide for most precision edging. If you want to go completely clean or finish off any awkward upper-lip areas, you might want to use something smaller.

The Super Beard left the odd scraggly hair afterwards, but with more care and attention you should be able to keep that to a minimum. Besides, who wants their face rug to look fake anyway?

There’s a charging stand in the box, but unless you’re spectacularly vain/thorough (delete as appropriate) the Super Beard’s 60-minute battery will keep you going for yonks between charges, so some sort of storage case would’ve been nice.

If you’re looking to maintain a tidy all-over fuzz rather than tricking people into thinking that you’re part-viking, the Super Beard is the best trimmer we’ve tried.

Buy now: Babyliss Super Beard 7879U for £45 from Amazon

Remington MB4045 Beard Kit

Pros:

  • Great value
  • Great cut range
  • Even cut

Cons:

  • Slightly plasticky build
  • Combs are a pin to attach

The beardiest of Remington’s range of facial-hair tamers, the MB4045 is designed for maintaining a beard your most tattooed local barista would be proud of.

It feels fairly sturdy in the hand, but the dials and switches are a bit on the plasticky side. The combs are also a bit of a pain to attach, and the teeth have quite a lot of flex in them, which could lead to an uneven cut if you press it against your face too hard.

The MB4045 comes with three attachments: two combs that can be adjusted for length using the wheel on the trimmer itself, and a smaller one with adjustable plastic teeth for keeping your ‘tache in check. It’s also got one of those pop-out mini-blades for precision trimming.

Using one of the longer attachments (the smaller one goes from 1mm to 5mm, the mid-length come goes from 1.5 to 18mm, while the larger can deal with anything between 20 and 35mm) the Remington MB4045 Beard Kit offers a pretty even cut, with only a few stragglers left behind. If you’re after ultimate neatness there’s a small pair of scissors in the box that you can use to tidy up afterwards.

Buy now: Remington MB4045 Beard Kit for £29 / $52.84 from Amazon

 

Panasonic ER-GB96

Pros:

  • Excellent cut range
  • Washable body
  • Consistent cut length

Cons:

  • Expensive

If you’re going for the well-groomed lumberjack look, the Panasonic ER-GB96 comes with three thick, plastic comb attachments, the largest of which will cater for serious bushiness.

It’s pretty pricey, but this beard trimmer has a suitably heavy-duty feel to it, with a rotating barrel allowing you to change the position of the comb. It works in 0.5mm increments, so combined with the three different guard sizes, the ER-GB96 can cope with even the most impressive rug, managing beard lengths from 1mm to 30mm.

With so many lengths to choose from (58 in total) it can take a bit of trial and error to find the combination that provides the length you’re after but you should only really need to do that once or twice depending on what look you’re going for. The thick plastic means the guard won’t move around while you shave either, so you get a consistent length of cut. If you get up close you’ll notice a few stragglers, but to most people your beard will look very evenly trimmed.

There’s also a fourth attachment that covers all but a small section at one end of the blades, allowing you to deal with more intricate areas such as your upper lip (there’s a £99 GB-86 also available that comes without this). This fourth attachment is a touch fiddly to use, though.

Taking an hour to charge, the Panasonic ER-GB96 should give you 50m of life before you need to plug it in again. The body is washable, making it straightforward to maintain this beard trimmer.

If you’re trying to maintain anything longer than a few millimetres the PR-GB96 should have you covered, but the high price could put some off.

Philips Series 9000 BT9280 (£120)

They’ve been used to guide missiles, keep your shelves level and fix wonky eyesight, but now you can even use lasers to make sure your facial hair is trimmed to perfection.

Rather than using a powerful beam of light to singe off any hair it touches, the laser that the Philips Series 9000 BT9280 beams on to your face is designed to give you a nice straight edge to follow. Never mind the fact that it assumes you’re able to hold it perfectly straight as you go, in practice the red line can be quite distracting, plus there’s a slight reflection off the blades making it harder to see what you’re doing than when using your old-fashioned eyes. Considering how much it adds to the cost, the Series 9000 BT9280’s laser just isn’t useful enough.

Once you attach one of the two comb guards the laser can’t pop up, but with a maximum cutting length of 7mm, the Series 9000 isn’t really suitable for anything too bushy. The teeth of the attachments are nice and rigid, and it does a pretty decent job of taming the longer hairs of an all-over fuzz, although for £120 you’d expect it to excel.

The Series 9000 feels well built and certainly looks expensive, with a small LED display to indicate what length it’s set to and a reversible cutting head for dealing with more hard-to-reach spots.

Buy now: Philips Series 9000 BT9280 for £98.75 from Amazon

Philips Series 7000 BT7202

Pros

  • Integrated vacuum
  • Good cut range

Cons

  • Hard to get precise trimming
  • Only the blades are waterproof

It’s pretty much impossible to trim a beard without your bathroom sink looking like you just shaved a mouse. Philips aims to put an end to the basin mess with the tiny vacuum cleaner inside the Series 7000 BT7202.

In operation, the combination of shaver and vacuum is not as noisy as you’d expect, with hair being sucked into a chamber underneath the blades as you cut. It won’t catch everything, particularly if you’ve got it set at lengths over about 6mm, but it certainly leaves a lot less to clean up, plus you can give yourself a quick going over before going out without having to worry about covering your clothes in too much hairy shrapnel.

The chamber where the hair collects isn’t removable, so cleaning the Series 7000 BT7202 can be a bit of a pain. A tiny cleaning brush is included in the box but it feels more suited to an archaeological dig. Only the blades are waterproof as well, so you can’t just rinse the chamber out under the tap.

Minor maintenance issues aside, the Series 7000 BT7202 offers a pretty even cut, with 20 length settings between 0.5 and 10mm, although the comb attachment is quite large, so it can be difficult to be as precise as you might like, particularly in areas such as where beard becomes sideburn. If you want to cut close to the skin, you can’t just take the comb attachment off. Instead, you have to remove the blade head completely and switch to the precision trimmer, but it’s a very simple process that only takes a second.

If you’re cultivating something longer, then, the Series 700 isn’t really suitable, but for everyday beard upkeep it keeps fuss to a minimum.

Buy now: Philips Series 7000 BT7202 for £37.50 / $132 from Amazon

Those are our top picks of the best beard trimmers. If you want to know more about choosing the right model for you then read on.

Bear trimmer buying guide

Can I use a razor?

Most razors are designed to cut extremely close, removing all evidence of a beard. While some have adjustable guards, to cut hair to a different length, you’ll find it hard to maintain and sculpt your facial hair with a traditional electric razor. Instead, beard trimmers are designed specifically to keep your beard in check.

Corded or cordless?

All of the models that we’ve reviewed here are cordless. This makes them easier to manoeuvre, and easier to handle. Cheaper, corded beard trimmers are available, but being tethered to a power socket is too restrictive, and battery-powered models are far easier to use.

Length

Beard trimmers come with adjustable combs that define the shortest and longest cuts that can be made. Shorter facial hair usually sits under the 10mm mark, with longer full-bodied beards coming in longer. Measure the length of your beard hairs, and think about your intended growth. Make sure that you buy a beard trimmer that can handle the minimum and maximums in that range.

What else should I look out for

Total battery life is useful. With longer-lasting beard trimmers, you don’t have to plug them in so often. If you want to use your beard trimmer in the shower or on wet hair, then get a model that’s waterproof; waterproof models can also be easier to clean and maintain. An integrated vacuum can be a neat option if you want to keep your sink free of those annoying little shavings.