Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

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People still living in an analogue age ought to note that the 32LE210E’s connections only contain a single Scart and no separate S-Video or composite video inputs. Though to be honest, we wouldn’t expect this to be a problem to the majority of our presumably reasonably tech-savvy readers.

Elsewhere, other important jacks you do get include a D-Sub PC terminal, and a respectable if not earth-shattering three HDMIs.


Readers who know their Freeview HD onions might have been troubled by the mention earlier of the 32LE210E’s lack of an Ethernet port. After all, such ports are a formal requirement of any TV carrying a Freeview HD tuner. And so it is that we’ve stumbled upon the one big feature compromise the 32LE210E expects you to swallow in return for its lowly price: there’s no Freeview HD tuner. Just standard def Freeview.

Heading into the 32LE210E’s unusually organised but very attractive and effective onscreen menus in search of more subtle features of note proves a slightly disappointing exercise. It becomes obvious, for a start, that the set really doesn’t have much going on in terms of picture processing.


Certainly there’s no sign of any 100Hz technology, raising concerns about the set’s potential motion handling. Nor is there much to keep tweakers busy, with the most ‘high-tech’ adjustments on offer being nothing more than a simple backlight adjustment and a straightforward noise reduction system. Woo.

To be fair, Sharp could argue that people spending as little on a TV as they need to for the 32LE210E probably won’t be particularly worried about calibrating their new set to the nth degree. But let’s not forget that Toshiba has similarly priced TVs featuring some pretty extensive picture adjustment options - so if they can do it, it would have been great if Sharp had too.

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