Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

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This timeshifting functionality is even more startling a discovery on the sub-£350 32DH510E than it was on the 32LE210E, and represents a real point of difference between it and other budget 32in screens. Especially as recordings seem pretty much identical to the original broadcasts.

The bad similarity is that as with the 32LE210E, the 32DH510 doesn’t have a Freeview HD tuner. It just has a standard definition Freeview one. This is arguably easier to forgive on the 32DH510E, though, given that the £80 or so less it costs versus the 32LE210E could go a good way towards buying an external Freeview HD tuner. Plus, of course, it’s much easier to accept a sub-£350 TV not having a Freeview HD tuner than it is a £400-plus model.

The 32DH510 also resembles the 32LE210 with its performance, to some extent. Which isn’t necessarily a great thing, for it means pictures make a quite strong first impression, but start to show a few cracks over time.


Helping to build the strong first impressions is a startling level of brightness for a CCFL LCD TV of the 32DH510E’s size and price level. Pictures really do blast forth with an almost LED-like level of intensity. This is very helpful, of course, since it means the 32DH510E can potentially be used almost anywhere in a house, even traditionally very bright rooms like conservatories or kitchens.

Also pleasantly surprising is how sharp the 32DH510E looks when showing HD. Provided you keep the pretty underwhelming noise reduction option turned off with HD, there’s a good sense of detail and crispness - despite the non-full HD resolution and the TV’s very low price. Even motion doesn’t blur excessively with HD material. In fact, there seems slightly less motion blur with HD than you get with the 32LE210E, and much less than you might expect with your average sub-£350 32in TV.

This is particularly surprising since the 32DH510E doesn’t have any serious picture processing to help it out - not even 100Hz. Actually, the set arguably makes a strength of the lack of processing, as its pictures avoid the rather processed look you get with some processing-laden TVs.

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