Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

The Magic Touch window often changes to give directional movement and a central select or OK button. It'll do four directions or just up and down if a menu is on screen. When you are playing music you've got play/pause, back forwards and music list viewing. When you are using the camera you can toggle the macro mode and flash, use the self timer and adjust the exposure.

This could all sound quite familiar. It is the same idea as used in LG's KF600, though that phone took a rather more ‘fun' approach to the general look and feel of its user interface skins.

In the case of the Samsung Soul things are customisable but in a rather more controlled manner. You can set the colours used in the Magic Touch window, but the icons stay the same. You can, though, create themes for the handset using an on board tool that offers an easy or an expert mode. The latter lets you really go to town playing with every aspect of the main display to create something really personal.

Fortunately Call and End functions are not part of the Magical Touch window's services. Instead, these mechanical buttons sit to the Magic Touch window's left and right, with two more softmenu buttons sitting below them.

And just as fortunately the Magical Touch window works a treat. You can calibrate its sensitivity to meet your requirements. And there is a slight vibration from the phone when a tap is registered. The options offered are useful and relevant and the played down graphics which avoid a blingy appearance are businesslike rather than flashy. It is all really very good as far as touch systems go.

Technically this is also a well featured handset. It supports 3G with HSDPA at speeds up to 7.2Mbps. You'll need to be a Vodafone customer and in central London or at an airport to get this at the moment, but as far as future-proofing goes the spec is top-notch.

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