Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

The top of the mouse is dominated by two large rubber buttons which have a very responsive click to them. The scroll wheel is very tactile and easy to use even in the thick of battle. On both the left and right side are two buttons, bringing the total mouse buttons up to seven. The side button pairs are accessed by a rocker switch, so pressing the rocker at each end presses a separate button.



All the buttons on the mouse are programmable via the Razer configuration utility. By default the rear, left side button is used for “on the fly” sensitivity adjustment. Much like the Logitech MX518, you can alter the sensitivity of the Diamondback whenever you choose. Pressing and holding button four (the rear left side button) brings up a graphical indication of the mouse sensitivity, then rotating the scroll wheel will either raise or lower the sensitivity. Although in theory this is a great idea, in practice it’s a little more complicated. Trying to change your sensitivity while playing a game can be tricky, since the graphic tends to flicker constantly while you try to set the mouse speed. That said, it’s still a big improvement over the single button 800/1600dpi setting on the Saitek, but I still prefer the plus/minus sensitivity buttons on the Logitech.

In use, the Razer Diamondback is definitely fast, while also being light enough to whip from side to side quickly. But my main criticism is somewhat odd, in fact it’s pretty much the opposite to the complaint that I have about most mice. The problem I have with a lot of mice is that they’re too big – when you’ve got small hands, hefting around a large mouse isn’t that easy. Also, when I’m gaming I rest the heel of my palm on the desk and move the mouse with my thumb and ring finger, for fast and accurate movement, but I can’t do this with a large mouse. It therefore came as quite a surprise to me that the Diamondback is actually too small for me to comfortably use.

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