Awards

  • Recommended by TR

Summary

Our Score

9/10

Review Price free/subscription

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It's great, too, to see just how much flexibility the 15S1 puts at your disposal when it comes to getting the perfect balance of brightness and contrast, with two brightness output settings and three different iris settings that radically affect how much - or little - light ultimately emerges from the projector.

Other key set up options include a series of image presets (including a trio of Theater modes), a noise reduction option best avoided with HD material, separate tweaks for the gain and bias of the Red, Green and Blue image components, a luminance gain system, chroma delay introduction, and black level adjustment.


Plus there's plenty of more basic help for you when it comes to getting the image perfectly aligned on your screen, including keystone correction, three simple adjustable legs for altering the projection angle, a handy vertical image shift ‘wheel' on the projector's top, and a decent level of optical zoom. Though it is worth pointing out that the lens is a fairly long-throw affair and so the 15S1 might not give you a big enough image if you've only got a small room to play with.

Our experience of watching the 15S1 in action actually starts with a negative, as we immediately noticed that it's a bit of a noisy runner. The cooling fans and colour wheel combine to emit a really quite noticeable whir that can definitely be heard over quiet scenes in films, particularly if you've got the lamp set to its highest setting and your seating position is within a couple of metres of the projector's site.


We'd suggest that you either try and get the unit boxed into some kind of soundproof cabinet, or else try and have it roof positioned as far away from your seats as possible.

Thankfully, once you focus away from its running noise and onto the pictures it was designed to deliver, things look up. Massively.

Fed our tried and trusted Casino Royale Blu-ray, the 15S1 immediately impressed in a number of key ways. For starters, during the opening black and white sequence it displayed a striking combination of emphatically deep blacks and bright peak whites, helping the image look exceptionally dynamic and cinematic.

It was also a treat to find the picture's dark areas looking rich and clean, with precious little sign of the grey dotting that's been the bane of so many DLP projectors over the years.

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