Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price £91.90

If you’ve read my previous review of Logitech’s MX Revolution mouse, you’d know the company has a knack for creating good looking and innovative peripherals .

While it’s been doing it for years, recently Logitech has been excelling itself and the wireless diNovo Edge is another example of it trying to push the bar just that little bit higher.

Although the diNovo has an SRP of £149.99, a quick snoop about the Internet reveals it’s available for in the region of £105 – which is still expensive but at least not prohibitively so.



Regardless of cost the diNovo is a handsome beast, and it’s well worth taking the time to admire the photos. Laser cut from a single sheet of Plexiglass, the diNovo is only 11mm thick with a glossy black finish that’ll bring out the inner magpie in all of us.

To complement this striking look, the diNovo features a smart brushed aluminium palm rest as well as a pointedly ornamental charging stand. This, combined with the striking design, indicates that the diNovo’s true home is the living room rather than sitting on a desk.

This idea is further enhanced by the inclusion of a circular touch pad, or TouchDisc as Logitech are calling it, enabling you to comfortably operate a Media Center PC whilst chilling out, maxing and relaxing all cool on your designer sofa. Then, once done with it, popping it in its stand to allow people to admire it as one might an Apple notebook.



Before one gets carried away with all this aesthetic frippery however, let’s not forget that the diNovo does still have a function to perform – being a keyboard.

Out of the box Logitech includes a USB Bluetooth Receiver, the charger stand, Set Point Software CD and a Quick Start Guide. Rather like a great number of manufacturers these days, Logitech doesn’t provide a full manual with its products though support is readily available online.

Also included is a small cloth, and you‘ll soon see why it’s needed because the Plexiglass finish suffers badly from fingerprint marks. That the keyboard features a touch sensitive volume control only compounds the problem, and short of wearing surgical gloves or having your fingerprints surgically removed it’s impossible to avoid defacing the silky smooth surface.



When looking at the layout the lack of a number pad is immediately apparent, with the TouchDisc and touch sensitive volume control taking up the vacated space. Personally I didn’t miss it but perennial number pad users – otherwise known as accountants – need not apply.

At first reflection you’d be forgiven for thinking the TouchDisc to be a hair-brained idea; a monitor screen is after all square – or rectangular depending on the aspect – and certainly not circular. But, with a little tweaking of the sensitivity settings, it is possible on a 19 inch 4:3 aspect monitor to move the cursor to opposite corners in one movement.

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