Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

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LG claims a 20,000:1 contrast ratio, a 5ms response time and 300 nits of brightness, all of which sound very encouraging, and the screen's aspect ratio is 16:10 with a resolution of 1,680 x 1,050 pixels, which means there's a little bit of downscaling when displaying 1,920 x 1,080 pictures from a Blu-ray player, but not much.

The set is extremely easy to use. It doesn't launch straight into auto tuning when first turned on but the option is easy to find in the setup menu, and it finds the entire spectrum of digital and analogue channels in less than five minutes.


The menu design is displayed in sumptuous hi-def with crisp pictures illustrating each section of the setup menu. All of the options are clearly displayed with sharp, sizeable text and they're structured in a way that avoids unnecessary submenus. Also impressive is the EPG, which is laid out in a horizontal timeline format with the remote's coloured keys enabling you to change the date and set the timer. It's laid over the top of the picture too, so you don't miss anything while surfing the schedules.

And if you're looking for a masterclass in how to make a TV remote, check out the M2294D's zapper. The button layout is admirably simple; the main menu controls are large and perfectly positioned and all the other functions are easy to find. Another nice touch is the input button, which brings up a large onscreen display that shows you pictures of each input.


To test its picture prowess, we started by plugging in a Samsung BD-P1400 Blu-ray deck and watching Warner's TMNT disc. This all-CGI kid's movie looks absolutely stunning on the LG's 22in screen, rendering all of its fine detail with pin-point accuracy. The picture also looks deeper and more cinematic than we expected, thanks to its above average black handling capabilities, and there's lots of visible detail during darker scenes. The backlight glow prevents black objects from going truly black, but they're dark enough to prevent pictures from looking washed out.

The quoted 5ms response time also rings true, with the turtles' frenetic kung-fu moves presented without much subjective evidence of motion blur. Switching to ‘live-action' movies like Spider-Man 3 or 300 reveals more of the same high detail levels, vibrant colour and punchy blacks, as well as snappy motion handling.

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