Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

Also worthy of note is Fuji’s claim that the battery in the F10 will last for 500 shots. Unfortunately I didn’t have time to test this empirically, but using the camera over two days and taking around 100 shots didn’t budge the battery condition indicator from its highest level. The camera is recharged via the same socket as the USB and A/V connection, and has a special plug with a three-way adaptor for this purpose.

In common with the FinePix Z1, the F10 has Fuji’s new-look menu system, which is a dramatic improvement over the old one. It is quick, clear and concise, and you can tell at a glance what options are available in each different shooting mode.



The main control is the big chunky mode dial surrounding the shutter button on the top panel. It has only four positions. SP mode is an automatic mode that offers five scene settings; natural light, portrait, landscape, sport and night scene. Automatic mode disables and greys out the manual exposure compensation, white balance, metering mode and AF mode options in the menu, leaving only the choice of high speed shooting and drive mode.

Manual mode is the setting that most keen photographers will favour, since it offers the greatest degree of creative control, including EV compensation, seven white balance pre-sets including a manual setting, the choice of multi-zone, average or spot metering, and three AF settings including centre, multi-point and continuous AF. Although it isn’t strictly speaking full manual control – there is no manual exposure of focus setting – it does allow enough control for some artistic shots.



In common with most of Fuji’s range, the F10 also has a Function button that provides quick access to image size/quality, ISO sensitivity and colour mode, with a choice of standard, high saturation or monochrome. The F button functions are available in all shooting modes.

So, on to the big news, and that rather extravagant claim by Fujifilm that it has finally conquered high-ISO image noise. Well, to cut a long story short, it’s pretty much true. As usual with these reviews I took similar shots at all ISO settings, and when I got the camera home and uploaded the images to my PC I was stunned by the results.

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