Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

Evesham 32in Alqemi TX LCD TV

With recent price cuts in the Evesham LCD TV range the company has, in no uncertain terms, positioned itself in the budget LCD market. It’s a sensible move really, especially considering the number of marquee brands Evesham must compete against. Of course, as John Archer pointed out in his recent review of the Alqemi 42SX, there’s always a certain level of impending trepidation when reviewing budget LCD TVs and I couldn’t help but share his sentiments when faced the Alqemi 32in Alqemi TX.

We’ve had the TV setup in the office for a while, just waiting for some attention. But, well, just looking at it inspired little in the way of confidence. To use an oft used analogy, if one were to look up ‘generic’ in the dictionary there’s a good chance you’d see this TV sitting there. The matt black plastic, the awkward styling, the slightly nonsensical gap between the speakers and main body of the TV; they all combine to cast grave doubts over its proficiency.

Thankfully, things do look up once you take a look at the feature list. For starters it’s cheap, just £499 for 32in of viewing and a level connectivity you’d be pleased to find on a TV costing twice the price. In all there are two SCART sockets, S-Video, composite, component, HDMI, D-Sub, DVI and 3.5mm audio inputs while analogue and digital TV tuners are also built-in.

There’s also a Common Interface (CI) slot for TopUp TV functionality and a set of audio and video outputs including one RCA video, three RCA audio (one sub, two main) and an optical out too. The very picky might want to see another HDMI port, but if you want multiple HDMI ports you need to be spending more money than this and even then you might not be getting as much as the Evesham in terms of overall connectivity.

Panel specification throws up little in the way of surprises. A native resolution of 1366 x 768 is par for the course, as is the 1000:1 contrast ratio, the 550 cd/m2 brightness rating and the 8ms response time. Predictably, however, it’s the image quality that suffers the most from the budget outlook; although not as much as the generic exterior might have suggested.

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