Sharp Aquos LC-46LE821E 46in LED-Lit LCD TV - Sharp Aquos LC-46LE821E Review

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Given the motion blur problems we found with Sharp’s LE600E and LE700E direct LED TVs, it’s a relief to report that the 46LE821E handles motion rather well, with minimal blur or judder. There’s a small price to pay for this extra clarity in the form of some gentle motion artefacts – mostly the familiar distortion haloes around moving objects. But if you’re careful with the TV’s settings, you shouldn’t find yourself distracted by these side-effects too often.


The lack of motion blur allows us to fully embrace the screen’s excellent crispness and level of detail when showing HD pictures, too. And finally, Sharp has really upped its standard definition upscaling game for its ground-breaking new TV, finally managing to make standard def sources look reasonably sharp and clean rather than soft and noisy.


Sharp has upped its audio game for the 46LE821E, too. There’s much more raw power at the disposal of its speakers than we found with last year’s Sharp models, which helps the soundstage appear crisper, more expansive, more dynamic and generally more immersive. A bit more bass depth would have sealed the audio deal, but we’d say it’s a perfectly adequate accompaniment to the outstanding pictures.


”’Verdict”’


If Quad Pixel technology had been developed by the likes of Sony, Samsung or Panasonic, you can bet your bottom dollar they’d be screaming about it at the top of their marketing lungs from the top of the nearest mountain. Sadly, Sharp doesn’t seem to currently lavish anywhere near as much promotional muscle on its new technology as it deserves.


But do yourself a favour. If you don’t have a problem with spending £1,650 on a TV these days that doesn’t have 3D technology, book yourself an audition with the 46LE821E. You won’t be disappointed.


All that remains is to wonder how long it’s going to take Sharp to squeeze cyan and magenta sub-pixels in there too!