Sennheiser CX Sport

Pros

  • Secure fit
  • Overall good sound quality
  • Storage pouch and accessories
  • Robust built quality

Cons

  • Lack of isolation may be problematic
  • Slightly long and awkward cable
  • Relatively short battery life
  • Bit expensive

Key Features

  • Review Price: £119
  • Bluetooth 4.2, aptX and aptX low latency
  • 6-hour battery
  • IPX4 water-resistance

What are the Sennheiser CX Sport?

Sennheiser’s CX line of in-ear headphones have been around for years, and that legacy can be seen in the Sennheiser CX Sport. These wireless headphones bare similarities to the Sennheiser CX 6.00BT – but, as you’d expect, have been built to survive sweat and to not fall out of your ears during a workout.

In both instances, the CX Sport acquit themselves well. However, they’re a little pricey for what you’re getting and you might find the fit a little awkward, even if the headphones do prove secure.

Related: Best headphones for running

Sennheiser CX Sport – Design and comfort

The CX Sport have a predominantly black finish, with some lime green accents that immediately make them look sportier than Sennheiser’s other earphones. It a shame the green colouring isn’t reflective in anyway, or used more abundantly, since this would have been a useful safety feature for those intending to wear the CX Sport out on night runs.

The headphones are IPX4 rated, so will easily stand up to sweat and moisture. I wore them for a few rain-soaked runs and they were absolutely fine.

Sennheiser CX Sport

They come with three sets of wingtips to accommodate different-sized ears. This design is a mainstay of sports headphones – the wingtips are designed to catch your outer ear to help lock the headphones in place.

And they do a good job. The earbuds never felt like they’d come loose, during a run or through my weights-based workouts.

You also get a generous four sets of silicone tips that are inserted into your ear canal. Plus, a neoprene storage pouch is included to help stow the headphones when not in use.

Sennheiser CX Sport

Since these aren’t truly wireless earphones, there’s a connecting cable between the two earbuds with a loop designed to take in any excess if you want a tighter fit around the back of your neck.

An in-line remote with microphone sits below the right earbud and, slightly unconventionally, a separate battery pack sits below the left earbud. Lots of wireless neckband headphones have the battery integrated with the in-line remote, but this uneven weight can lead to it feeling like one earbud is always being pulled out of your ears.

Sennheiser CX Sport

For this reason, I was actually hopeful that the separate battery would help balance the two sides. Unfortunately, it didn’t really do the trick. The battery is slightly bigger and heavier, so it just felt like that side was more likely to come out (even if it wasn’t).

While there’s no concern that the earbuds will pop loose thanks to the secure wingtips, I found it hard to ignore the imbalanced sensation, which can be a distraction during a workout. If you’re not as sensitive to these little things, this might not be as much of an issue.

Sennheiser CX Sport

The length of the connecting cable also proved a little problematic. Even when using the cable tie to tighten the headphones, I still found they felt imbalanced and distracting.

Note that you also get a pinched ‘ponytail’ of excess cable when using the cable tie. The Jaybird X3 have a much better method of adjusting the length and accommodating different preferences elegantly. I actually preferred to wear the CX Sport headphones with the cable running down my front on many occasions to avoid the issue.

The buttons on the in-line remote have a good feel and they’re easy to identify by touch, so you’re not left fumbling to change the volume or swap tracks while running.

Bluetooth connectivity was rock-solid, without any drop-outs or stutters regardless of where I wore my phone on my body – or even if I left it in a bag on the other side of the gym floor.

Sennheiser CX Sport – Sound quality

These being Sennheiser product, the headphones sound decent overall.

My main issue is in the bass department, which I found could be a little lacking. This is in part due to the headphones not being particularly isolating. I couldn’t get a strong seal, no matter which silicone tips I opted for, which affects how bassy the headphones can sound.

Sennheiser CX Sport

I find the low-end particularly helpful in powering through a workout, so the fact it’s a little loose here is a shame. However, it might be beneficial if you need situational awareness when running outdoors.

Otherwise, the mids and treble are pleasantly detailed and the soundstage surprisingly wide, especially for headphones you’re likely to only be wearing during a workout.

Sennheiser CX Sport – Battery life

Sennheiser CX Sport

The CX Sport are rated as having a six-hour battery life, which I found was a little higher than what I saw in real-life testing. I found they lasted closer to five hours, which is disappointing considering the size of the separate battery housing. I have typically found that other similar neckband headphones sit closer to eight hours.

Charging is via micro-USB, and the port is hidden away on the in-line remote. Fortunately, a 10-minute charge nets you an hour of playback, with a full charge taking about 1.5 hours.

Why buy the Sennheiser CX Sport?

Sennheiser CX Sport

If you’re fond of the Sennheiser sound and have a familiarity with the CX range then you’ll find a lot to like about the CX Sport. The fit is secure, the build quality is great and the sound good.

However, battery life is short and you might find that comfort leaves something to be desired. The Jaybird X3 can typically be had for less money and would still be my pick for the superior running headphones.

Verdict

Sennheiser’s sporty take on the CX line is a mixed bag.

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