Porsche Cayman 2.9 PDK - Communication

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If audio playback is PCM’s strength and the navigation system merely adequate, telephony is where things really go south. First, it’s a bit of a shock to pay thousands of pounds for the full infotainment package only to find the Bluetooth connection requires a further £512. Then you discover that support for most brands of handset is extremely marginal.

To cut a long story short, our Cayman test car failed to recognise much less synch with several handsets including a 3G iPhone, HTC Touch HD and a Motorola model. In fact, the only brand of phone it would deign to talk to is Nokia. Our advice therefore is try before you buy if at all possible. Odds are, if you want a Cayman but demand Bluetooth phone functionality, you may have to switch to a Nokia handset. Short of that, you do have the option of the SIM slot in the centre console. But given what a palaver it is to whip the SIM out of some handsets, especially an iPhone, that’s not awfully practical.

Even then, pairing with a Nokia 6301 is a fairly slow process. The initial setup is a chore thanks to Porsche’s decision to eschew the usual four-digit security code for twelve-digit monster. Once you’ve muscled that into your phone, connection takes a further 20 to 25 seconds – which is also the time taken whenever you hop into the car and connect in future.


As for the minor matter of making and receiving calls, there are further surprises. For reasons we cannot quite compute, starting and ending phone calls can only be done via the hardware buttons above the touch panel. In other words, when an incoming call appears on the main display, there’s no touch-screen button to accept it. You must tap the hardware button. Not a deal breaker, we admit, but pretty perplexing all the same. Still, at least the system does support the sending and receiving of text messages.