MicroOptical Myvu Personal Video Viewer Review - MicroOptical Myvu Personal Video Viewer Review

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The iPod slips into a cradle with slots for the 30GB version and the thicker 60GB and 80GB versions. A clip is included so you can hang it off your belt if you wish. This contains a 1,440mAh Lithium-Ion battery that according to the manual will give you up to eight hours of battery life, though it says six hours on the box. I have to admit that I simply didn’t have the time to get through that much movie viewing to test that claim – I wish I did! But there’s a button on the back that when pressed illuminates four small lights to show you how much juice is left. After a good couple of hours of intermittent viewing only the first light began to fade, which would fit with the eight hour claim. That kind of battery life is impressive though and means you could get through two to three movies before this thing would run out.


You also get the choice of watching off the mains, with a wall charger included, as well as a car adaptor as well as a very nice zipped hard case to put it all in. The power from the cradle plugs into the connector at the base of the iPod and the Myvu glasses plug into the top of the cradle. This connector is the same as the one iPod, so you can just plug the glasses straight in and power them directly from the iPod battery. This is good news as once you’ve used the power up in your cradle you can just carry on watching. Hopefully not in one sitting though.


The glasses themselves are quite chunky but weigh only 75g, which isn’t too bad. MicroOptical has put in some effort at enabling you to customise the viewer to make it as comfortable as possible. There are three nosepieces included in the box, but I have to admit I couldn’t get the one that was attached off to swap them out. Instructions are provided and despite following them I could see that I was starting to break the piece attached so I left it where it was.


There are also three sets of ear buds provided to attach to the in ear headphones that are physically attached to the back of the frames – you can’ use your own headphones. I’m not a fan of these types of headphones and have frequently been accused of having mutant ears by Riyad. The default mid-sized ones were no use at all, but the smaller ones were better – I managed to get the right ear in, but the left one just kept falling out. It’s not just me though, my wife gave them a try and the same happened to her.