Loc8tor Lite Review - Loc8tor Lite Review

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The other issue with the Loc8tor Lite is range. The documentation states a range of 122m which is pretty impressive, until you realise that the quoted figure is in an open environment, so unless you’ve dropped your keys in a field or a park, you’re not going to get anywhere near that. In fact, if you’re trying to use the Loc8tor Lite in a busy shopping centre, as I was, you can probably cut that figure in half – especially when you consider that your wife/child could be on a different floor.


To be fair to Loc8tor, the company does stress that this device is for finding items rather than people, and although it’s useful for the latter, the limited range and the fact that people move about means that it’s not as useful as it could be.

With a price of £45 for the package, the Loc8tor Lite isn’t overpriced, but it’s not what I’d call an impulse purchase either. Considering that the Loc8tor Lite handset is wafer thin, and sports a tactile rubberised finish, at least you can see where some of the cost has gone this time, compared to the original Loc8tor Plus.


Despite its limitations, I can’t help but like the Loc8tor Lite. Its simplistic brief and much improved design over the previous version did win me over to some extent. That said, the Loc8tor Lite really has to be viewed as a fun gadget more than a truly useful tool.


”’Verdict”’


I really like what Loc8tor is doing with its devices – they’re simple to use, small enough to be unobtrusive and pretty much do what they’re supposed to. However, the operational range limits the usefulness and I can’t help feeling that anyone who loses their keys regularly is just as likely to lose the Loc8tor handset.


If you view the Loc8tor Lite as a gadget, you’ll get a lot of fun out of it and probably find it very useful once in a while. Just don’t go thinking that it’s the ultimate solution for the absent minded.

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