Abit RX300 SE-Guru - Abit RX300 SE-Guru Review

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Before you ask, the second jumper selects between PAL and NTSC TV output, so this is something you’ll only have to set once. There are no ViVo capabilities on the RX300 SE-Guru which is a shame, but Abit does provide an S-Video cable, an S-Video to composite adapter and a composite video cable.

Sadly though, the RX300 SE-Guru didn’t really perform too well in the 3D tests, regardless of whether it was in standard mode or turbo mode. You’ll be able to play games like Unreal Tournament 2004 quite happily as even in default mode the card managed over 56fps but I didn’t managed to get playable frame rates in any of the other games I tested the card with, which was quite a disappointment.


A lot of this is probably down to the slow memory speed and the fact that the Radeon X300 SE GPU only has four pixel pipelines – most cards these days have eight, 12 or even 16 pixel pipes. It did however complete 3DMark05, which is better than you would expect from an entry level graphics card and as long as you’re happy to play your games at a resolution of 1,024 x 768 or lower, this RX300 SE-Guru will be “ok” for modern games.

If you’re just looking for a cheap PCI Express graphics card for Windows usage, there are still cheaper alternatives around as the RX300 SE-Guru will set you back £59.98 which isn’t exactly the bottom end of the price spectrum.


”’Verdict”’


The RX300 SE-Guru has some interesting features and if Abit carries these features through to its more upmarket graphics cards I think we’ll be seeing some very interesting products this coming year. Ultimately though, the RX300 SE-Guru is an unimpressive graphics solution – you won’t be getting the best out of any of the latest 3D games so you might as well save some money and go for something cheaper, or dig a little deeper and buy a more powerful card.