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Samsung Galaxy A series 2021: The full range explained

Samsung has unveiled a trio of new A-series phones for 2021. These include the A52, A52 5G and A72. 

While these devices all sport a similar overall design and a 64-megapixel rear camera, they differ in a number of other ways.

We’ve gone in-depth on the three devices below, and we’ve spent a few days with the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, so check out our hands-on and video for a deeper look at that phone.

Samsung Galaxy A52

The entry-level A52 model ditches 5G and won’t be sold in the UK. It boasts a 90Hz AMOLED 6.5-inch 1080p display with a small cut-out for the 32-megapixel front camera.

Inside you’ll find an octa-core chipset and either 4, 6 or 8GB of RAM. 4GB of RAM seems a little low for an Android phone these days; however, it should be fine for basic stuff.

It comes with a 4500mAh battery with 25W charging, and the body of the phone is IP67 rated. In terms of camera setup, you’re looking at a 64-megapixel main camera with OIS and plenty of AI optimisation modes inside the camera app. The three other cameras consist of a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, a 5-megapixel depth and 5-megapixel macro.

See below for a few more details:

  • 189g
  • 75.1 x 159.9 x 8.4mm
  • Four colours: black, blue, white and violet
  • 800 nits of brightness
  • 128GB or 256GB storage options
  • One UI 3.0
  • MicroSD up to 1TB
  • 15W charger in the box

The device will be available for €349. US pricing has yet to be revealed and this model won’t be available in the UK.

Samsung Galaxy A52 5G

The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G seems like the true flagship in this latest range of A-series phones. It has the fastest screen and 5G support, both of which should help it compete with the best mid-range phones on the market.

The 6.5-inch FHD+ 120Hz OLED display is a standout feature – and, in our short time with the device, we’ve found it to be one of the best screens available at this price.

Other features include a 4500mAh battery, Dolby Atmos speakers and a 64-megapixel main camera with OIS and a bunch of AI optimisation modes.

The three other cameras consist of a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, 5-megapixel depth and 5-megapixel macro. There’s also a 32-megapixel selfie shooter on the front and a Snapdragon 750G chipset inside.

You’ll be able to get the phone in 6 and 8GB versions, with those models coming with 128GB and 256GB storage respectively. There’s expandable storage via MicroSD, too – something you won’t find on the Samsung Galaxy S21 series.

See below for a few more details:

  • 189g
  • 75.1 x 159.9 x 8.4mm
  • Four colours: black, blue, white and violet
  • 800 nits of brightness
  • One UI 3
  • Micro SD up to 1TB
  • 15W charger in the box

The device will be available for £399. US pricing has yet to be revealed.

Samsung Galaxy A72

The biggest, priciest member of the new A-series phones omits a few of the higher-end touches of the A52 5G – but it does still include a bigger display and battery.

Here you have a 6.7-inch panel with a 90Hz refresh rate and a 1080p/FHD+ resolution. There’s a hefty 5000mAh battery, too. As a result, it’s the heaviest device of the bunch at 203g.

Another benefit of the A72 is that it’s the only one of the range to include a 3x optical zoom-capable lens. The other cameras are a 64-megapixel main, 5-megapixel macro and 12-megapixel ultra-wide.

There’s no 5G support available with the A72.

See below for a few more details:

  • 77.4 x 165 x 8.4mm x 8.4mm
  • Four colours: black, blue, white and violet
  • 800 nits of brightness
  • One UI 3
  • MicroSD up to 1TB
  • 15W charger in the box

The device will be available for £419/€449. US pricing has yet to be revealed.

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