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Nintendo admits Wii U is not a “worthy” successor to the Wii

Nintendo has admitted the Nintendo Wii U isn’t yet a “worthy” successor to the original Nintendo Wii.

Satoru Iwata, Nintendo President, admitted the weakness of the Wii U during the company’s quarterly earnings call.

Unfortunately, the Wii U has struggled since it was launched last year, only selling around 3.91 million units globally.

“Except for its backward compatibility with existing Wii software and accessories, we have so far failed to make propositions worthy of Wii U’s position as a successor to the Wii system”, said Iwata.

It seems Iwata believes Nintendo has failed to highlight the key services and titles that really show off the capabilities of the Wii U.

New titles like Wii Sports Club and Wii Fit U are now available in Japan and should help to boost overall sales of the Wii U. Wii Fit U is coming to the UK on December 6.

Iwata highlighted Super Mario 3D World as the key title to driving sales of the Wii U, saying the game will help raise end of year sales for the console.

However, he added with caution that one title is not enough to change the fate of the struggling Wii U.

“I remarked a while ago that it is difficult to change our prospects with just one title. Our objective for Wii U for the upcoming year-end sales season will be to dramatically change the environment surrounding Wii U with multiple key titles that can appeal to a wide range of consumers.”

The Super Mario 3D World release date for the UK is November 29, the same day as the PS4, so could struggle against the host of new titles coming to both it and the Xbox One, released a week previously.

Next, read our pick of the best games of 2013.


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