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Microsoft to phase out Kinect for Windows v.1 in 2015

Microsoft has announced plans to remove the original Kinect for Windows sensor from sale during 2015, in order to focus on the new model.

On its official blog (via Slashgear) the company says the retirement of version 1 “marks the next stage in our journey toward more natural human computing.”

Back in October the firm publicly released a new version of the sensor along with a revamped SDK 2.0 enabling developers to create and publish a host of new and exciting Kinect-enabled tools for PC users.

The new sensor offers enhanced body tracking, full 1080p HD video, an expanded field of view, new active infrared capabilities and greater depth fidelity.

Read more: Xbox One review – One year on

The firm said: “The original Kinect for Windows sensor was a milestone achievement in the world of natural human computing. It allowed developers to create solutions that broke through the old barriers of mouse and keyboard interactions, opening up entirely new commercial experiences in multiple industries, including retail, education, healthcare, education, and manufacturing. 

“The original Kinect let preschoolers play educational games by simply moving their arms; it coached patients through physical rehabilitation; it gave shoppers new ways to engage with merchandise and even try on clothes. The list of innovative solutions powered by the original Kinect for Windows goes on and on.”

Microsoft hasn’t announced exactly when it’ll be withdrawing the first sensor from sale, but if you’re after some, better get in there quick.

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