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Mac Mini 2022: Will it still launch this year?

The Mac Mini 2022 was expected to be unveiled during Apple’s Spring showcase, but the company launched the Mac Studio instead.

The Mac Mini is essentially a Pro model of the Mac Mini, featuring a similar compact PC design, but with more powerful specs thanks to the M1 Max and M1 Ultra chips.

Since the Peek Performance Apple event has come and gone, it seems that we won’t be meeting the Mac Mini until 2023, with rumours from analysts suggesting that it will launch either towards the end of this year or next year alongside the next-gen M2 chipset.

Make sure you bookmark this page, as we’ll be updating it every time new information comes out about the Mac Mini?

Price

There are no details in regards to the price for the Mac Mini 2022 just yet.

The Mac Mini 2020 currently costs £699/$699, so it’s likely that a new iteration would retain the same price.

Release date

Reports previously suggested the Mac Mini 2022 would be unveiled during the 8 March 2022 showcase, but Apple launched the Mac Studio, with the Mac Studio Display, instead.

However, new rumours from renowned analyst Ming-Chi Kuo (via Twitter) suggest that the Mac Mini likely won’t launch until 2023. He added that it is likely to launch alongside the M2 chip, alongside the Mac Pro and iMac Pro.

Design

Reports indicate that the Mac Mini 2022 could see a design overhaul, with the dinky desktop PC potentially becoming even smaller.

The last iteration was 1.4-inches tall, and now Apple leaker Jon Prosser (via Front Page Tech) suggests the new Mac could be less than an inch tall, though it’s important that we take this speculation with a pinch of salt.

Prosser also mentioned that the Mac Mini could have a plexiglass-like top that will go over an aluminium enclosure, which should give it a sleek look. Prosser provided the below render, showing what the new Mac Mini could potentially look like according to his sources. But since Apple didn’t create the image, this is likely not what the final design will look like.

Jon Prosser renders of the potential Mac Mini 2022
Credit: Jon Prosser

But we can still expect the Mac Mini to keep its iconic square build, with some rumours suggesting that there could be a two-tone colour effect instead of the single white or black colouring Apple is known for. We can hope that there will be multiple colour options, as offered by the iMac 2021 (24-inch).

In terms of ports, some reports indicate that it will offer up to four Thunderbolt ports (which is two up from the latest model), alongside an ethernet port, HDMI and a power input.

Specs

The Mac Mini 2022 was originally rumoured to feature M1 Pro and M1 Max chip configurations, but the emergence of the Mac Studio makes this unlikely now.

It’s more likely that the Mac Mini will feature an M2 chip instead, since this will be an entry-level chip and will replace the existing M1 processor. It’s also possible that we could see an M2 Pro chip replace the current high-end Intel configurations, although it’s hard to be sure at this point.

Be sure to keep checking in with Trusted Reviews, as we’ll be updating this hub whenever more rumours or news becomes available about the upcoming desktop PC.

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