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Google Chrome 68 will label unencrypted websites as “not secure”

Google will label all unencrypted web pages as “not secure” in a forthcoming Google Chrome browser update.

Sites that don’t use the HTTPS protocol will come with a warning after Chrome 68 rolls out in July this year.

As part of its longstanding drive to push websites to embrace encrypted connections, Google is further distancing itself from HTTP sites.

Related: Best web browsers

Whereas the padlock and the word “Secure” appears in the URL bar next to secured pages, the words “Not Secure” will appear next to unsecured portals.

Here’s how it’ll look in Chrome 68, compared to the current treatment of HTTP pages.

Google Chrome 68

“Chrome’s new interface will help users understand that all HTTP sites are not secure, and continue to move the web toward a secure HTTPS web by default,” the company says in a statement.

For the last three years, Google has been giving search priority to HTTPS sites in a move it dubbed “carrot and stick”.

Given the firm’s market share sits above 50%, this could have far-reaching ramifications and may even be followed by Microsoft, Mozilla and Apple; the other major browser players.

Chrome 68 will also crack down on third-party apps that can cause crashes.

Will this affect the way you use the web? Drop us a line @TrustedReviews on Twitter.

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