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Fappocalypse when? UK gov’s porn block could be delayed, again

The Government’s long-awaited porn block seems to have hit another bump in the road, more than a year after it was first due to come into force.

Officially, the tug prohibition is still planned to appear on July 15, but whispers are circulating that perhaps the whole thing is unenforceable, and might just be a bit too much work.

This latest rumour comes from national newspaper the Daily Star, which is reporting that government bods are worried about Mozilla and Google’s DNS encryption plans, which could mean that Firefox and Chrome (the two most popular browsers) won’t play nice with the porn block at all.

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“The age verification measures… although those are not directly affected [by DNS encryption] it does effect enforcement of access to non-compliant websites,” said Mark Hoe, from the government’s National Cyber Security Centre, in a talk given at the ISP association’s annual conference.  “So, whereas we had previously envisaged that ISPs would be able to block access to non-compliant sites, [those] using DNS filtering techniques don’t provide a way around that.”

Some 35m people are thought to be affected, and will need to provide private details, or at least ambling down to the newsagents to let their local shop know they are keen to get off.

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The government seem keen to say that they’re very much on track, and all things porn will be hidden behind a government approved curtain by July 15, but the logistics of how the government are actually going to pull it off, especially when you consider they’re in the midst of electing a new prime minister amongst themselves and trying to haul us out of the European Union after that plan has hit delays, remains to be seen.

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