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Eedu is an educational drone kit to help you learn robotics

Wouldn’t it be cool to make your own drone? Eedu lets you do just that.

It’s a hardware and software kit that lets you piece together your own flying machine, and make apps for it to boot.

So far, the makers claim, drones are little more than flying cameras. And they’ve got a point. They want to unlock these devices’ potential, and open up a whole world of applications. Maybe yours could sniff out hazardous material? Have temperature sensors for feeling heat? The only limitations are your imagination, and your programming skills.

The drone looks simple to put together, then it’s a case of downloading the firm’s app-making program. Then get busy making your own apps, or use ones already available. Laser tag, for example. Attach the laser tag pod, and you can shoot rival drones also equipped with the same tech. Just make sure they don’t shoot you first.

The propellers are made of lightweight, soft plastic, so they won’t do anyone any harm. There’s a safety mechanism too, that automatically disables the rotors whenever something interferes with the propellers.

Read more: 11 jaw-dropping videos that will make you want a drone

It runs on Linux with an Intel Edison inside – this is a tiny computer that’s found in many wearables. The firm is also sponsoring a campaign to get more of its drones into schools, so the next generation of coders can get busy. What will they come up with? (The prospect scares us a little.)

It’s still a way off its $100,000 funding goal, so here’s hoping it gets there. It’s not cheap though, at $449 (£294).

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