Does Amazon job listing reveal plans to offer Premier League football for free?

Amazon planning to launch free TV channels in the UK, via the Prime Video streaming service, judging by a recent job posting.

The firm is advertising for a ‘head of free to air TV and advertising’ in London. This suggests the company is looking to offer some programming for non-Prime subscribers and support it with advertising.

Should Amazon launch such a service it could place them in competition with terrestrial broadcasts like Channel 4 and ITV in the chase for advertising revenue.

It could also offer insight into Amazon’s plans for the Premier League football rights it has obtained for three seasons between 2019 and 2022. The company paid £90 million for access to 20 games on two match days, breaking the stranglehold of BT Sport and Sky.

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Until now we’ve heard that fans will need a £79-a-year Amazon Prime subscription in order to watch the top flight action, but the job posting suggests Amazon could be open to letting more people watch.

Amazon shows limited commercials for its subscription Prime TV service, but sports offer a unique opportunity. There’s a 15-minute half time period in football that’s perfect for an influx of ads, not to mention all the pre- and post-match rigmarole during which viewers are completely used to ads.

However, most of this is speculation on our part, because Amazon doesn’t provide additional details within the job listing.

The post on LinkedIn (via Engadget) says: “Channels have launched in US, UK and Germany and this is a new and fast-growing area within Prime Video. As part of this expansion we are seeking a senior leader to join the European Channels & Sports team, based in London. This individual will be responsible for widening the content range with the development of free and advertising-funded channels.”

Will Amazon offer UK viewers free access to top flight football for the first time since since 1992? Or are we dreaming? Drop us a line @TrustedReviews on Twitter.