Here are all the Sonos speakers that will lose support in May – and what to do if you’re affected

Sonos upset scores of users this week, when it announced that a range of products − some that were available to purchase as recently as 2015 − would lose support this May.

Here are all of the products we know will be affected:

  • Sonos Zone Players (ZP80, ZP90, ZP100, ZP120)
  • Sonos Connect
  • Sonos Connect:Amp
  • Sonos Play:5 (1st Generation)
  • Sonos CR200
  • Sonos Bridge

If you’re not sure if your Sonos product will be affected, you can also check the ‘System’ tab in your Sonos account.

While the majority of these speakers have since been upgraded or replaced with newer models, some only left the market relatively recently. The Connect:Amp, for example, was available for purchase in 2015.

The news has left many fans frustrated and unsure of what to do with their speakers.

What to do if your Sonos speaker is affected

Your first option is to continue using your speaker until you can’t. While it won’t stop working straight away, you won’t get any future software updates or new features and eventually it will lose access to services and functionality altogether.

Option two is to trade in your outdated speaker for a newer model. Sonos’ Trade Up programme offers shoppers 30% credit for every legacy product you replace.

Related: Best multi-room speakers

This should slightly reduce the sting of being forced to upgrade, though it might feel a bit like rewarding Sonos for the inconvenience.

Sonos has told Trusted Reviews that customers can expect newer products to be supported for at least five years after sales end, which is something to bear in mind if you’re considering sticking with the brand.

Your third option is to combine the above actions by splitting your existing system into two parts: supported products in one system and dying (sorry, legacy) in the other. Do this and you’ll be able to get use out of your legacy products right to the end, while still receiving all of the new features and services on your supported speakers.

However, the main downside to splitting your system up is that you will no longer be able to play your music across all devices.

It’s not the most convenient option but it might just be worth the sacrifice if you have a mix of old and new devices and aren’t ready to splash out for another upgrade just yet.

While none of these options is exactly ideal, they should give you a better idea of how you can make the most of your legacy products going forward.

Sonos speakers are a pricey investment for many and, in light of the announcement, lifelong shoppers are beginning to second guess their allegiance to the brand:

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