Home / TVs & Audio / TV / Toshiba Regza 46VL758

Toshiba Regza 46VL758 review

John Archer

By

Reviewed:

Summary

Our Score:

7

Toshiba isn’t a brand we particularly associate with the ugly stick. Its sets might not set new aesthetic standards or establish new trends, but they’re certainly not ugly. Especially for TVs usually found at the budget end of the TV market.

However, it would seem that Toshiba has been feeling a little insecure about its looks. Either that, or it’s been feeling a little insecure about becoming increasingly identified with cheap and cheerful telly fare, and has decided to try and get back into the (usually more profitable) premium end of the TV market.

For before us today, in the shape of the 46VL758, sits a true designer TV. A set for which Toshiba coughed up likely large amounts of cash in order to secure the talents of the internationally renowned Jacob Jensen Design studio.

This is a studio known and admired throughout the world for its work in multiple product design areas, from home appliances through to furniture and other TVs and audio products. And it’s really come up trumps in terms of the 46VL758’s build quality, which features practically no plastic and sits atop a gorgeous brushed metal stand. It’s also good to find the main screen coming in at well under 30mm in depth, and sporting a bank of touch-sensitive control buttons that you can’t even see until you activate them.

Yet somehow, despite all this, the 46VL758 still doesn’t really look special. The problem is that its design qualities are all matters of detail - stuff you can only fully appreciate once you’re up close and personal. From a normal viewing distance, the set doesn’t really look all that different to plenty of other 46in TVs. Not ugly, by any means, but not truly original in the way other brands have managed to be when using the services of external design specialists.

With this in mind, it’s perhaps fortunate that despite showing a flicker of premium intent from Toshiba, the 46VL758 isn’t actually spectacularly expensive by 46in TV standards. So if it can serve up some cracking picture and sound quality to go with its sleek and well-constructed bodywork, it can certainly still end up being a highly successful TV.

Another sign of the sort of attention to detail that’s the strongest suit of the 46VL758’s design comes from the way many of its most widely used connections can be accessed from the TV’s side. This is a much better option for people wanting to wall-hang their TV than the common approach of having all sockets facing directly out of a TV’s back.

RonRoyce

December 17, 2010, 3:37 pm

I have noticed you keep saying that Toshiba’s DLNA capable TV's only support DLNA through Windows 7. Well I beg to differ, as I will explain.





Although in the instruction manual and on their website they push Windows 7 as the way to access the TV via DLNA, this is purely because it is easy to set up as the supplied WMP has transcoding built into it, therefore you don't need to buy a separate media server. However, this feature is not restricted to Windows 7 PC’s. With a little research you will find 3rd party software on line to enable transcoding on Vista and XP based PC's.





Unfortunately, the results using WMP+transcoding are horrible with poor quality video and terrible sound. Why I have no idea, but its fair to say that the transcoding on WMP sucks big time and I’d avoid using it at all costs. To confirm it is an issue with Windows transcoding I tried it on my mates Samsung (I forget the model name) and the results were just as bad.





But WMP is not the only solution for a Toshiba DLNA enabled TV. DLNA media servers can be set up to work with them and it is a piece of cake. I use Twonky Media with my 40SL753 and I can tell you the results are superb - much, much better than any windows based transcoding with excellent video/audio quality and seamless operation. Having checked out what the 46VL758 supports on DLNA.org I have no doubt whatever that this model will give exactly the same results if given the chance.





For interest my mate’s Samsung fared just as well when he bought a DLNA capable media server. So I am of the opinion that the Windows PC method is probably the worst way to experience what a DLNA capable TV can do.





It may help if you went to the DLNA website and looked at what the TV actually supports. It might also help if you actually tested alternative methods - surely you have a DLNA approved media server for testing purposes? For interest here are the official DLNA certificates for the 40SL753 and the 46VL758:





http://certification.dlna.org/...





http://certification.dlna.org/...





Of late I am beginning to wonder if we can actually trust the reviews on this site. I looked back at the 40SL753 review and I noticed you slated the DLNA performance. Clearly you didn’t try another DLNA capable media server. Very lazy! I also thought you were very harsh on the Motorola XT720 mobile phone. I preferred it in spades to the Samsung Galaxy – a device you rated higher, yet is flimsy in comparison to the Motorola and, to me at least, was a very mixed bag in operation, plus I really did not like the hazy quality of the display.





I have noticed a few other comments of late about the laziness of some articles and some highly dubious review ratings (Nokia N8 is one, which I see has since been revised). I may have to start looking elsewhere for more representative and informative reviews and news.

Enigma

December 18, 2010, 4:57 am

Man, are we TR readers demanding!! I hope you Journos are thick skinned ;-)





Anyway, the only reason I am prompted comment is my reaction to the price:





You CAN NOT be serious? Are you nuts Toshiba? To paraphrase, Schh, you know who!





Send your Marketing people back to school.

RonRoyce

December 20, 2010, 1:59 pm

@Enigma





It is not a case of being demanding, it is a case of pointing out a factual error.





The review states that the TV's DLNA functionality is limited to Windows 7 PC's. This is factually incorrect, as my SL753 works seamlessly with a DLNA certified media server (Twonky Media). I checked the DLNA certificate of the 46VL758 and it has exactly the same capabilities as mine so I am sure this TV will function just as well with other certified DLNA media servers.





Can I ask what your beef with the price is? It is similar to other freeview HD models from Samsung (46C5800), LG (47LE5300/5900) and Sony (46EX403/503/713). I don't quite understand what your issue is. Whether it, or the competition, are worth this outlay or not is another debate but at least realise that thie price of this set is not dissimilar to what's out there.

Enigma

December 20, 2010, 11:21 pm

My "beef" is compare what Tosh is offering and what LG (LG 50PX990 Review) and others are offering:





http://www.trustedreviews.com/...





http://www.trustedreviews.com/...

RonRoyce

December 21, 2010, 12:02 am

@Enigma





They are both plasmas. The Tosh is LED edge lit LCD. Plasmas, for whatever reason, seem to be cheaper for comparable size/spec.





The TV's I listed are all the same tech as the Tosh, likewise none of them have 3d and all are in a similar price range. Therefore, if you're going to level those accuastions at Tosh then you must do the same to the others as they would appear 'light' on the spec front too.

Enigma

December 22, 2010, 1:34 am

@RonRoyce





Yes, I was well aware.





However, it is clear we have different value system.

RonRoyce

December 22, 2010, 3:13 am

Yes we do. In my opinion you like to compare apples with pears. It does seem that plasmas are generally cheaper than LCD's, particularly LED back/edge lit ones. Thus, the models I mentioned, which all have a similar feature list to the Tosh reviewed, appear to be over priced compared to the two TV's you listed.





Also, not everyone likes plasma. I have issues with it, particularly the image retention problem noted with the LG - I have seen this and it is very off-putting in my opinion and would stop be buying one. But I am impressed with Panny plasmas, always have been. Now Pioneer no longer make them we only have them to hold the torch for the best that plasma can do.





Also, the LG does not have Freeview HD, although the Panny does (and Freesat too), so it becomes a bit 'horses for courses' with that TV. Of the two you listed I would pick the panny personally. But if I was going to splash out on a TV I would pick a philips 9 series - they just look gorgeous if you spend the time setting them up.

Enigma

December 22, 2010, 5:26 am

@RonRoyce





It seems you have 'proven' that you can compare apples (LCD) and pears (Plasma). You look at the benefits of each and decide which offers best value...... In the end it seems we are in agreement as per your last para.





Merry X-Mas and Happy New Year.

RonRoyce

December 23, 2010, 1:19 pm

I said if I was to pick one of the two TV's you listed...Also I used the word 'appear' in my first paragraph. This is because I do not necessarily agree that the TV's I listed are actually over priced. They are two different technologies with their own fans.





If I was to buy a 46/47" TV around the £1k price tag I would consider all of the models listed, including the plasmas. However, I think I would end up with an LCD because I do favour the way it presents a picture.

motaz

August 24, 2014, 11:03 am

i need to connect my pc to toshiba regza screen by vga it is work , now in the same time i want to connect the output of toshiba regza to sharp tv screen by hdmi so i want to view my pc in the sharp tv this not work

comments powered by Disqus