Summary

Our Score

7/10

Pros

  • Some manual settings
  • Image stabilisation
  • Good value

Cons

  • Digital zoom
  • Mediocre image quality
  • No built-in USB plug

Review Price £95.00

Key Features: 5 Megapixel CMOS; 16x digital zoom; SDXC memory slot; LED video light; Slow motion and time lapse modes

Manufacturer: Toshiba

Toshiba Camileo B10

When Cisco killed the Flip brand, it looked like the pocket Internet camcorder era had peaked. But most other companies have merrily continued to release models at this level regardless. Toshiba has been focusing on the budget end of the market for longer than most, although its camcorders haven't usually conformed entirely to the pocket Internet genre. The Camileo B10, however, fits quite squarely into this niche, although there are some notable differences.



The basic format is what you would expect. The B10's chassis is about the size of a small mobile phone, and the lens sits on one side in a similar fashion too. There's a D-pad surrounded by a smattering of buttons on the other side, beneath a 2in TFT. Most of the time, you will just turn the unit on, shoot some video and a picture or two, and then turn it off. There's no USB plug built directly in, leaving you to rely on a separate cable. But otherwise the usual trademark features of a pocket Internet camcorder are in evidence.

Toshiba Camileo B10

The B10 does have a few more features than many of its competitors, though. The 16x telephoto seems impressive at first glance, but it's still digital so noticeably pixellates the image when you zoom in. There's a discrete button on the side which turns on the LED video light and toggles between this and what Toshiba calls "digital light" mode. This is essentially a single-setting video gain option, which does boost brightness, but at the expense of washing out the colour and introducing a grainy quality to the image due to sensor noise. The LED video light is no better than smartphone LED video lights, too, so only effective at very close range. We found it petered out rapidly beyond a metre range, but could still come in handy for shooting nearby objects in the dark.

Next page
comments powered by Disqus