Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Pros

  • Superb 2D and 3D pictures
  • Easy to use
  • Extensive image adjustments

Cons

  • Limited features
  • No need for two video adjustment menus
  • Lightweight build quality

Review Price £129.99

Key Features: Full-HD 3D playback; DivX HD, MKV, MP3 & JPEG playback; USB port; BD Live; Built-in picture adjustments

Manufacturer: Toshiba

Design and Connections

The BDX3200 is one of two Blu-ray players Toshiba has launched this year to partner its latest range of 3D flat panel Regza TVs. The BDX3200 is the better-specified of the two, adding 3D playback to the BDX1200’s spec sheet for a premium of around £45.

Previous Toshiba players have been rather conservative affairs, shunning the eye-catching features of its Japanese peers for straight-up affordable Blu-ray movie playback, and a quick scan of the spec sheet reveals the BDX3200 offers more of the same (aside from 3D of course). That’s not necessarily a bad move though, given that not everyone cares about streaming files round the house or watching YouTube clips on their TV.BDX3200 4

Toshiba certainly hasn’t ignored the design conscious among you, dressing the BDX3200 in alluring gloss-black bodywork adorned by a glinting silver strip running along the top of the fascia and an illuminated Blu-ray logo in the middle. We’re not talking heavyweight build quality here as the deck is light as a feather, but it’s certainly easy on the eye – not to mention slim, with a height of just 42.5mm. The tiny display panel is quite difficult to read though, and the row of buttons on the right looks a little gawky next to some of its rivals’ sexy touch-sensitive controls.
BDX3200 2

Next to that display panel is a USB port hidden behind a flap to stop younger members of the family jamming Twiglets into it (other snacks are available). That’s backed up on the rear panel by a modest array of connections, including HDMI v1.4, composite, analogue stereo and coaxial digital audio outputs. Once again Toshiba hasn’t yet gone down the Wi-Fi route, which leaves the Ethernet port your only way of getting online – fine if your router is situated close by, a logistical nightmare if not.

Being a budget player it comes as no surprise to find there isn’t a second HDMI output for non 3D-ready AV receivers and no multichannel analogue outputs, but it’s worth pointing out.

Next page
comments powered by Disqus