Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Pros

  • Superb pictures
  • Easy to use
  • Good digital music format support

Cons

  • Remote
  • Features not commensurate with price
  • Few connections
  • No DivX support

Review Price £139.99

Key Features: BD Live support; MP3, JPEG, MKV, AVCHD, AAC, WAV, JPEG playback; USB port; Dolby True HD & DTS HD Master Audio support; Picture adjustments

Manufacturer: Toshiba

With prices falling faster than Luis Suarez in the penalty box, Blu-ray players are no longer a luxury item. It’s now cheaper than ever to get yourself a hi-def deck, which is largely down to companies like Toshiba, whose habit of launching modest players at knock-down prices has helped bring the format to the masses.

Case in point: the BDX1250. It’s a player designed to play hi-def movies and little else, lacking the hi-tech frills that can bump up the price. As a result, you miss out on things like DLNA networking and web content – they’re reserved for the step-up BDX2250 – and there’s no 3D support either, but if you’re stepping up from DVD or buying a player for the bedroom this could be just the ticket.

Toshiba BDX1250

The budget approach means it’s not the most robustly built or eye-catching player you’ll ever see, but it’s remarkably slim and compact, plus the black finish is easy on the eye and will complement most flat-panel TVs. The only clutter on the front panel is four buttons controlling play, stop, tray open and power. USB ports are notable by their absence on the front but you will find one on the back for media playback and for local BD Live storage.

Toshiba BDX1250

Joining it on the rear is that all-important HDMI socket, which doesn’t support 3D but does offer CEC (Regza Link) functionality (for automatically switching the TV input when the player's turned on) with Toshiba TVs, if that’s of any use. Alongside this is a coaxial digital audio output, which may come in useful if your receiver pre-dates the HDMI revolution, while the Ethernet port is your only gateway to BD Live – there’s no support for Wi-Fi whatsoever. And that, as they say, is yer lot…

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