Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

Score

Sections

  • Page 1Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier
  • Page 2 The Verdict

Pros

  • Great third-person combat with strong tactical elements
  • Excellent graphics
  • Compelling multiplayer options

Cons

  • Dodgy cut-scene visuals
  • Not as strategy-focused as previous Ghost Recons
  • Dumb CoD-style storyline

Key Features

  • Review Price: £34.95

Available on Xbox 360 (version tested), PS3
Gut feelings can be wrong. First impressions may mislead you. For the first half hour or so we had Future Soldier down as the game where Ghost Recon sold its soul. The series that used to lead was now following, taking huge swathes of its third-person shooter gameplay from Gears of War, and its look and feel from Modern Warfare and its sequels.

Expansive, open levels seemed reduced to narrow corridors, and the old brand of tactical action had bitten the dust in favour of standard-issue, shooting gallery thrills. Remember the disappointment when you realised that Battlefield 3’s single-player mode was little more than a second-rate Modern Warfare clone? Future Soldier had us fearing a repeat.

Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

Yet the more you play Ubisoft’s latest, the less this dismissive attitude holds water. Sure, the globe-trotting special forces storyline comes straight from the Call of Duty playbook, but Future Soldier isn’t anywhere near as dumb as it first appears.

Underneath the gung-ho dialogue and shooter cliches – here’s the sniper mission, get ready for the helicopter turret sequence – it’s still a tight, strategic shooter that asks you to do a little more than just take headshots on goons as they pop out of cover. It’s arguably the best game in its genre since Battlefield: Bad Company 2.

A Fresh Start

Future Soldier breaks from Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter and its sequel by abandoning the Mexican setting and hero, Captain Mitchell, for a squad of fairly generic Ghosts and a fairly epic saga with missions spanning Central America, Pakistan, Nigeria and a range of locations in Russia.

Where Advanced Warfighter had a tighter focus and a vague air of realism, this is much more of a James Bond affair in the bold and boisterous Modern Warfare style, complete with global plots, Russian paramilitary forces, cackling villains and slightly ludicrous plot twists. It’s partly this that gives it that Infinity Ward feel.

Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

All the same, those exotic locales give Future Soldier plenty of opportunity to show off the latest version of Ubisoft’s YETI engine, and whether you’re padding through the drifting snow or pushing through the Nigerian desert in the middle of a sandstorm, the effects are spectacular.

The engine seems to struggle with faces in the cut-scenes, but otherwise Future Soldier is as beautiful as military shooters come, with the kind of realistic lighting and effects that we saw in last year’s Battlefield, and thoroughly convincing Ghosts and enemies.

Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

Future Combat
Up to a point, Future Soldier sticks to the basics of the cover-based shooter, with lots of running between cover points and a nice manoeuvre to swap between adjacent ones. Enemy AI is competent, and missions are staged so that you have to maintain a degree of awareness or go down rapidly in a hail of bullets. Through most of the game you’ll have three allies, and these can heal you if you go down, but Future Soldier isn’t a run-and-gun shooter. In fact, it punishes that kind of approach.

More from TrustedReviews

LG Q8 finally brings the V20’s promise to Europe

Atari is now in the speaker business… and the hat business

Thinner Moto Z2 Force could come with a huge trade-off

HyperLoop One

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop gathering pace as NY-DC link gets ‘OK’

N64oid

Is this proof an N64 Classic will follow the SNES?

Agents of Mayhem preview

cats 17

Why you’ll want to download this OnePlus 5 update today

Golf rory

British Open Golf Live Stream: How to watch online for free

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare for Xbox One down to under £9

Samsung Gear S3 finally gets Samsung Pay support in UK

Welcome to the all new Trusted Reviews

Netgear Arlo

Netgear Arlo Pro

Cat Amazon

Are you kitten me? Pet translation devices tipped for future smart homes

fire emblem warriors

Fire Emblem Warriors

pokken

Pokkén Tournament DX

TP-Link Smart Wi-Fi LED Bulb 5

TP-Link Smart Wi-Fi LED Bulb

Samsung Pay

Samsung Pay now lets you use your PayPal funds at the checkout

assassins creed origins

Ubisoft teases new games for Nintendo Switch, coming ‘quite soon’

amazon echo

Ask Vodafone: Mobile network’s first Amazon Alexa voice skill is revealed

Google Feed

The Google app’s new personalised feed might just drag you off Facebook

z2play 9

Moto Z2 Play

Mira Prism

For just $99 you can bring AR to the iPhone 7

Samsung Galaxy S8

Samsung Galaxy S9 displays may be the same, save one major new feature

movie theatre

The Netflix Effect: ‘Binge-watching’ is coming to movie theatres

Porsche MIssion E

Porsche’s latest electric car chargers put Tesla to shame

EE logo

EE’s new 20GB SIM-free deal is the best value tariff you’ll see all summer

Int-Ball

These are the first images from the ISS – as captured by a zero-gravity drone

iMac 21.5-inch 4K (2017)

LG V30 case

LG V30 design ‘confirmed’ ahead of IFA 2017 launch

iPhone 7 vs iPhone SE

Waiting for the iPhone SE 2? Sadly, it could be a one-and-done

Google Glass Enterprise

Google Glass 2 has arrived, sort of

Denon AH-C621R

Denon AH-C621R

BBC Proms

Get ready to listen to the BBC Proms like never before

Fender Newport Monterey Bluetooth speakers

Fender’s new Bluetooth speakers look just like tiny guitar amps

Garmin Vivosmart 3

Garmin Vivosmart 3

airplane

Is the laptop travel ban dead? Electronics restrictions lifted by TSA but UK fails to follow suit

KitSound Immerse

KitSound Immerse Wireless Headphones

Emojis

It’s World Emoji Day and Apple is showing off all of its newcomers

Porn Block

Privacy fears as UK plans age verification for porn sites

WhatsApp

New WhatsApp feature could give Apple’s iMessage a run for its money