Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price £40.99

However, there are some problems. For Move to work, you also need to plug-in the PlayStation Eye and position it on or under your TV, pointing the lens where you’re going to stand or sit. As the Eye’s thick USB cable has a nasty habit of pulling the camera out of position, this isn’t as easy as it sounds, and you may have to find ways of securing it in place. What's more, the Eye - at least in some games – seems to limit who can play them.

Even with the camera set to its wide-angle mode, it's difficult to get adults and smaller children in the frame at the same time in an average sized room; something that won’t matter to the hardcore gamer, but might affect families with younger kids. There are also issues with lighting. Some games seem more sensitive than others, but to play, say, Sports Champions, we had to close curtains or switch off certain wall lights. These issues don't crop up with the infra-red based Wii.

Still, one good thing about Move is its sheer flexibility. You can play most games with just the one controller, but some support two for added realism, and shooters and action games will support a nunchuck-style Navigation controller (which we’ve yet to receive samples of) to handle movement. If you don’t want to invest in this, however, you don’t have to: Move will also partner with a standard Dual Shock 3 controller if need be.

Calibration differs from game to game. In Sports Champions, for example, you calibrate the controller(s) before each event, holding the glowing bulb at your side, your shoulder and your belt buckle in turn. Other titles, like Start the Party and Kung-Fu Rider, ask you just to point the controller at the screen and press Move. In either case it’s not difficult, and Move seems to need less frequent recalibrating than the MotionPlus-enhanced Wii.

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