Summary

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Just as much of a problem as its comparison with the iPod Touch is the innate rivalry it will have with Android phones, many of which offer the same specs (and more) you'll find here. The screen's nothing special, suffering from contrast shift and middling overall quality, and there's little significant optimisation in the software. Aside from  SongBird and SimplyShare, you're largely dealing with vanilla Android here.Connect


At least it's a decent version of Android, though. The unit we saw on the show floor at IFA was an Android 2.2 FroYo device, benfiting from the significant speed boosts that version introduced. We didn't get to check out any taxing games on the device to check its CPU power - we'll have to wait until we get our review unit for that privilege.

We did encounter the issue we often find with 3.2in devices though. The screen is just that little bit too small to make typing away in portrait mode completely comfortable. Some optimisation in the virtual keyboard itself would help, but the bog-standard Android keyboard features here. Once again, we can’t help but bring up the comparison to the iPod Touch, with its slightly larger 3.5in screen and better virtual keyboard. Of course, being an Android device with full Market access, there’s plenty of scope to indulge in a bit of app-based DIY improvement.Connect

We have a feeling this will be the case throughout the GoGear Connect. At heart, it’s not that much different from a mid-range Android phone. It has more memory – coming with 8GB or 16GB of memory built-in – and no cellular ability, but to get the most out of it you’ll need to spend a while tinkering away at it with gems harvested from the Android Market.

While it may trump the awful Samsung Android media player and Archos’s 43, it won’t have the USP to lure buyers away from forking out for a budget Android phone or an iPod Touch. But hopefully we’ll change our minds when our review unit arrives, eh?
 

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