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YouTube gives Red card to creators who won’t opt into new tier

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YouTube Red

While the initial reaction to the newly-announced YouTube Red subscription service has been largely positive, not everyone is likely to be impressed with the way Google has gone about securing all that content.

Google has confirmed (via TechCrunch), YouTube content creators who don’t agree to the terms of the ad-free $9.99 will have their videos removed from public view.

The tech giant has promised content creators a slice of the subscription revenue to replace what they lose in advertising revenue.

However, the decision not to give those publishers a choice as to whether they wish to abide by the new tools is sure to raise eyebrows in some quarters.

During its YouTube Red launch event on Wednesday the company claimed 99 per cent of existing YouTube content will still be available on Red, suggesting almost all of the major contributors agreed to the terms.

However, given the alternative was banishment from public view and expulsion from the ad-free tier altogether, very few are likely to have said no.

TechCrunch also reports YouTube’s Chief Business Officer Robert Kyncl refused to go into detail on the precise share of the YouTube Red revenue that would be passed back to the contributors.

However, it was revealed that cash will be dished out to users depending on how long viewers spend watching the clip.

Will the result of that be popular contributors producing longer videos that keep viewers engaged for greater periods of time?

YouTube Red will be available in the US from October 28 and will include a subscription to the new YouTube Music app, as well as full access to Google Play Music.

The company has promised a roll out in other territories soon.

Dead Words

October 22, 2015, 1:07 am

Eh. I can't really get around a YouTube like this. YouTube is a simple video service. Oh, it's a great, beautiful, still unique video service. But trying to make it into what it's not: a Vevo, or Spotify, or Netflix, that I can't get around. I understand the ethics of business and how Google must make money, but I do wish they would keep YouTube simple. A service mostly ran by the content providers.

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