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Sony reveals 0.4% of PS4 consoles will be faulty on arrival

Luke Johnson by

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With the PS4 now on sale in the US, Sony has revealed that it expects 0.4 per cent of its next-gen consoles to be faulty upon arrival with consumers.

With the first PS4 problems having been reported earlier this week by early adopters in America, Sony has looked to quell concerns, stating that less than half a per cent of all PS4s shipped during the launch window will suffer from faults out of the box.

Although Sony has suggested these figures are “within our expectations for a new product introduction,” based on early PS4 sales predictions, this small percentage could still equate to more than 20,000 new consoles by the end of the year.

"A handful of people have reported issues with their PlayStation 4 systems," an official Sony spokesperson has stated. "This is within our expectations for a new product introduction, and the vast majority of PS4 feedback has been overwhelmingly positive.”

They added: “We are closely monitoring for additional reports, but we think these are isolated incidents and are on track for a great launch."

With gamers having reported bricking issues and problems with faulty HDMI connectors, the Sony spokesperson stated: “The number of affected systems represents less than 0.4 per cent of shipped units to date, which is within our expectations for a new product introduction."

After a number of PS4 pre-order customers in the States were sent their consoles early, the first PS4 problems quickly began to emerge.

“After playing a brief game of NBA 2k14 I quit and inserted my battlefield 4 disk. The system prompted for an update, so while watching the progress bar (Around 20%) my controller light turned from blue to white. Hasn't worked since,” NEOGaf user Dylx has reported.

His issues were added to by gaming journalist Stephen Totilo who stated: "The first retail PS4 we got from Sony didn't work.”

He added: “The first retail unit that Sony provided me failed to work when I plugged it into a TV in Kotaku's office. A colleague and I were able to compare it to a second PS4 that did work and we found that the issue was rather simple: the bad unit had a faulty HDMI jack that we couldn't fully plug an HDMI cable into.”

Read More: PS4 vs Xbox One

Via: Polygon

Go to comments

rebirthofcool

November 15, 2013, 2:20 pm

Sony acknowledging and responding to early adopters pushed up their integrity. In reality there's always a small percentage of defective electronic product (limited to functionality due to component failure) moving out of factories every time, the only difference lies on how intensive companies' QC testing methods to catch lemons, and a very small percentage below 1% is a good indication how product testing reflects excellent manufacturing standards of a company

dpanch_89

November 15, 2013, 3:54 pm

EPIC six sigma failure.

Guest

November 17, 2013, 12:45 am

Sony loves you

NM81

November 18, 2013, 8:43 am

Below 1%? Excellent manufacturing standards? Mate you have no clue. Have a look at what six sigma,is. It's is the error rate every business aspires to and you will find 0.4% is orders of magnitude higher than what would be expected. Its shoddy. To be clear am NOT suggesting the xbone will be any better. It will probably end up as poor and rushed as this brick in the making.

rebirthofcool

November 18, 2013, 12:35 pm

so engrossed with six sigma? ask Motorola if you only know ppm there;s ppb and ppt now and applies to component failures than finished products. don't try to bash products you won't appreciate and understand

rebirthofcool

November 18, 2013, 12:37 pm

engrossed with six sigma? ask Motorola

tek

November 18, 2013, 8:33 pm

Well 0.04 failure on that production scale is actually pretty good its always good to hear a nice comment of someone who has no clue about manufacturing. Even if six sigma assumes 0.02 on 1mil production it actually scales up with volume I want even go in to detail about the over reliance on probability maths and the rounded up value of e.

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