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Samsung Pay beta arrives in the United States

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Samsung is ramping up trials of its LoopPay-powered Samsung Pay platform with the launch of a public beta in the United States.

The mobile payments service will officially go live in the US on September 29, but those with compatible devices, networks and financial institutions can apply for a ‘special invite’ from today (via Android Central).

Willing participants must firstly have a Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge, Galaxy S6 Edge+ or a Galaxy Note 5. Then they must have a qualifying card from Bank of America MasterCard and Visa or the US Bank Visa.

The trial is available to those folks on the AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and US Cellular. Verizon customers can’t jump on board at this time.

See also: Apple Pay vs Samsung Pay

Samsung Pay potentially gives the Korean company an edge over NFC-based solutions offered by Apple Pay and the soon-to-launch Android Pay.

As well as offering mobile payments via NFC, Samsung’s solution includes LoopPay’s Magnetic Secure Transmission Technology, which is compatible with traditional card machines.

Instead of swiping a card, it sends a signal to the machine from the phone in order to send the payment details through.

Like Apple Pay Samsung uses Mobile Digital Enablement System tokenisation in order to send a one time payment token rather than the card details.

The Korean firm also users the device’s fingerprint sensor in order to authenticate purchases.

Related: Can Apple Pay really replace your wallet?

Samsung hasn’t confirmed when the service will come to Europe, but has committed to a launch in ‘the near future.’

Earlier this week we brought news that some major chains had jumped the gun somewhat when anticipating the arrival of Android Pay, which is said to be launching imminently.

With Apple Pay off to a strong start in the UK, it looks like these big three mobile titans could finally begin to revolutionise the way we pay.

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